The Ball Flights Associated With A Strong Golf Grip (Video)
The Ball Flights Associated With A Strong Golf Grip (Video)

The real key to understanding and seeing if you have too strong of the clubface position through your swing, is ball flight. Ball flight doesn’t lie. Now, what I’m going to talk about here is the different ball flights that you will see if you have that strong clubface position. This is assuming that you are striking these shots also from the center of the clubface because toe strikes and heel strikes can have an effect on trajectory. So these are associated with good ball strikes.

Now, first of all, having a strong golf grip, having a strong clubface position, what that will mean is that the clubface is coming into impact more closed than it normally would do. Now, when a clubface is coming into impact more closed, it means that the clubface is pointing further left than it normally would do. Now, if you deliver that clubface, which is pointing more left than normal, into impact with a club path which would you – would consider neutral, so pretty straight into the back of the ball. Because that clubface is pointing left, that’s going to have a determining factor on where the ball will finish. So with the path going straight and the clubface pointing left of that path, it will curve to the left in the air and that would become your pull hook shot. Now, if you then all of a sudden start swinging more outer in in this direction with the clubface still pointing that way, that’s going to be an even bigger pull hook. So shots that move off to the left-hand side to begin with and then curve further left in the air. Now, generally speaking, if you’re hitting those shots, your golfing brain will kick in and it will say, “Well, okay. I don’t want to hit it off to the left-hand side. What can I do?” That’s why you tend to see people with very strong grips start to deliver the club into this position moving into impact. So it’s very much from the inside. Now, what this does, it moves path further off to the right-hand side and it helps to neutralize that clubface. Because if your clubface is pointing left and you get that path moving a long way off to the right-hand side, this is where you start to get the ball started right and then curving left in the air. So this is the basis of a draw shot. However, if the grip is too strong, the path will continue to move further out to the right-hand side, the clubface will continue to get stronger and that’s the beginnings of the hook shot and that really destructive duck hook as well. So those are the ball flights which you associate with a strong clubface. It’s not always a 100% the case. You can get people who have a very strong clubface and still hit slices and fades as well. But generally speaking, if that ball is travelling too far off to the left-hand side with curvature, that means that the clubface is pointing too far left and you have a mismatch in between your path and your clubface position impact.
2016-10-25

The real key to understanding and seeing if you have too strong of the clubface position through your swing, is ball flight. Ball flight doesn’t lie. Now, what I’m going to talk about here is the different ball flights that you will see if you have that strong clubface position. This is assuming that you are striking these shots also from the center of the clubface because toe strikes and heel strikes can have an effect on trajectory. So these are associated with good ball strikes.

Now, first of all, having a strong golf grip, having a strong clubface position, what that will mean is that the clubface is coming into impact more closed than it normally would do. Now, when a clubface is coming into impact more closed, it means that the clubface is pointing further left than it normally would do. Now, if you deliver that clubface, which is pointing more left than normal, into impact with a club path which would you – would consider neutral, so pretty straight into the back of the ball. Because that clubface is pointing left, that’s going to have a determining factor on where the ball will finish. So with the path going straight and the clubface pointing left of that path, it will curve to the left in the air and that would become your pull hook shot. Now, if you then all of a sudden start swinging more outer in in this direction with the clubface still pointing that way, that’s going to be an even bigger pull hook. So shots that move off to the left-hand side to begin with and then curve further left in the air. Now, generally speaking, if you’re hitting those shots, your golfing brain will kick in and it will say, “Well, okay. I don’t want to hit it off to the left-hand side. What can I do?” That’s why you tend to see people with very strong grips start to deliver the club into this position moving into impact. So it’s very much from the inside. Now, what this does, it moves path further off to the right-hand side and it helps to neutralize that clubface. Because if your clubface is pointing left and you get that path moving a long way off to the right-hand side, this is where you start to get the ball started right and then curving left in the air. So this is the basis of a draw shot. However, if the grip is too strong, the path will continue to move further out to the right-hand side, the clubface will continue to get stronger and that’s the beginnings of the hook shot and that really destructive duck hook as well. So those are the ball flights which you associate with a strong clubface. It’s not always a 100% the case. You can get people who have a very strong clubface and still hit slices and fades as well. But generally speaking, if that ball is travelling too far off to the left-hand side with curvature, that means that the clubface is pointing too far left and you have a mismatch in between your path and your clubface position impact.