Playing Golf With A Strong Or Ultra Strong Grip (Video)
Playing Golf With A Strong Or Ultra Strong Grip (Video)

So when golfers start to learn to play the game, one of the first things that we often look to teach the golfer is the correct grip on the club, and it still amazes me how many people, even very experienced golfers, even more so more experienced golfers don’t actually have the correct grip, but for some people they use that grip to match their style of play and they actually make that sort of not less sort of technically correct grip position.

They make it work for them and they sort of make it work with rest of their swing sort of in unison. As long as your grip position matches the rest of your swing and desired short shape, you can get away with some fairly quirky positions. AND one of the places that we might look for kind of a quirky grip that works, with Paul Azinger. He had a very, very strong grip. Now let's just make sure we understand the term strong. Strong doesn’t necessarily apply to the pressure you’ll have tightly on squeezing the golf club, that isn’t what we are talking about here. The strong position is what we would refer to as having the hands too far to the right side for the right handed golfer. So if the left handed should be down the middle of the golf club here, so I could see two, maybe two and a half knuckles on the back of my left hand, a strong grip would be a grip where I can see three or even four knuckles around this position, that will be a quite strong grip. And likewise if the left hand is too far to the right and strong, generally speaking the right hand is going to be there as well, so the right hander almost takes his lead from the left, and that sits underneath as well into quite a strong position around here, so the strong left hand accompanied by the strong right hand. Now my pressure is actually relaxed and quite light here, but because my hands are turned to this side, they instinctively want to rotate back to neutral. Your hands have a neutral position like this; I’ve set them into a strong position, they now want to do more work. And that if that would be classed as strong, then it stands to reason that that would be the classed as weak. These hands want to do less work, so a one knuckle left hand grip and a hand over to the top is weak, want to do less work. This is going to be classed as a strong grip, want to do more work closing the club face, making the club face aim more left. Now, generally speaking that ball would go left. It would hook, or it would over drill down the left hand side. But if there is other components within your swing that worked to maybe neutralize the grip or help the ball flight out, some players Paul Azinger, a great example, was able to get away with a strong grip. During this next series of videos, let's look at how the strong grip can affect your ball flight and how it should work in unison with the rest of the swing
2016-05-04

So when golfers start to learn to play the game, one of the first things that we often look to teach the golfer is the correct grip on the club, and it still amazes me how many people, even very experienced golfers, even more so more experienced golfers don’t actually have the correct grip, but for some people they use that grip to match their style of play and they actually make that sort of not less sort of technically correct grip position.

They make it work for them and they sort of make it work with rest of their swing sort of in unison. As long as your grip position matches the rest of your swing and desired short shape, you can get away with some fairly quirky positions. AND one of the places that we might look for kind of a quirky grip that works, with Paul Azinger. He had a very, very strong grip. Now let's just make sure we understand the term strong. Strong doesn’t necessarily apply to the pressure you’ll have tightly on squeezing the golf club, that isn’t what we are talking about here. The strong position is what we would refer to as having the hands too far to the right side for the right handed golfer. So if the left handed should be down the middle of the golf club here, so I could see two, maybe two and a half knuckles on the back of my left hand, a strong grip would be a grip where I can see three or even four knuckles around this position, that will be a quite strong grip. And likewise if the left hand is too far to the right and strong, generally speaking the right hand is going to be there as well, so the right hander almost takes his lead from the left, and that sits underneath as well into quite a strong position around here, so the strong left hand accompanied by the strong right hand. Now my pressure is actually relaxed and quite light here, but because my hands are turned to this side, they instinctively want to rotate back to neutral. Your hands have a neutral position like this; I’ve set them into a strong position, they now want to do more work. And that if that would be classed as strong, then it stands to reason that that would be the classed as weak. These hands want to do less work, so a one knuckle left hand grip and a hand over to the top is weak, want to do less work. This is going to be classed as a strong grip, want to do more work closing the club face, making the club face aim more left. Now, generally speaking that ball would go left. It would hook, or it would over drill down the left hand side. But if there is other components within your swing that worked to maybe neutralize the grip or help the ball flight out, some players Paul Azinger, a great example, was able to get away with a strong grip. During this next series of videos, let's look at how the strong grip can affect your ball flight and how it should work in unison with the rest of the swing