Release Golf Club to Hit Running Chip Shot (Video)
Release Golf Club to Hit Running Chip Shot (Video)

So let’s imagine you're in a position there where you're off the green so you want to pitch the ball up but when the ball lands you do want it to release. You want to it to chase. Maybe its a very long green or maybe it's a two-tiered green where you've got a little bit of a level that you want to go up and over as well. We don’t want this ball to land and to spin like on some chip shots. We want to it to land and release so clearly cub selection is important here. We need to make sure we've got a club that doesn't have too much loft, it's not going to create too much backspin but then also we don’t want really want to sort of chop under the ball and hold it off and slice the ball onto the green because we don't need it to spin. We want to it to get down on the floor and just release a little bit stronger to the back of the green and up that tier so I'd encourage you to play the ball from the center of the standstill leaning into the left-hand side but just allow the hands and the arms just to naturally rotate slowly. We’re not talking about flicking the hands over and scooping them over. It's just letting the hands and arms do their normal thing so it would be toe up in the backswing, toe forwards in the downswing and toe up in the follow through, just quite a natural turn of the body. I’m not advocating holding the golf cub off like you would be for a higher flop shot or pitch shot, likewise not flicking the hands over but just a nice, smooth turn, turn. Let the hands release and you'll find that when that ball comes down, it will have a little bit left check spin and just a little bit more release so it will go stronger to the back of the green and if you need to a ball to run when it comes down, letting your hands cross over a little bit more should encourage that ball to roll the length of the green for you.

2012-09-17

So let’s imagine you're in a position there where you're off the green so you want to pitch the ball up but when the ball lands you do want it to release. You want to it to chase. Maybe its a very long green or maybe it's a two-tiered green where you've got a little bit of a level that you want to go up and over as well. We don’t want this ball to land and to spin like on some chip shots. We want to it to land and release so clearly cub selection is important here. We need to make sure we've got a club that doesn't have too much loft, it's not going to create too much backspin but then also we don’t want really want to sort of chop under the ball and hold it off and slice the ball onto the green because we don't need it to spin. We want to it to get down on the floor and just release a little bit stronger to the back of the green and up that tier so I'd encourage you to play the ball from the center of the standstill leaning into the left-hand side but just allow the hands and the arms just to naturally rotate slowly. We’re not talking about flicking the hands over and scooping them over. It's just letting the hands and arms do their normal thing so it would be toe up in the backswing, toe forwards in the downswing and toe up in the follow through, just quite a natural turn of the body. I’m not advocating holding the golf cub off like you would be for a higher flop shot or pitch shot, likewise not flicking the hands over but just a nice, smooth turn, turn. Let the hands release and you'll find that when that ball comes down, it will have a little bit left check spin and just a little bit more release so it will go stronger to the back of the green and if you need to a ball to run when it comes down, letting your hands cross over a little bit more should encourage that ball to roll the length of the green for you.