Overlapping vs Interlocking Whats the Best Golf Grip (Video)
Overlapping vs Interlocking Whats the Best Golf Grip (Video)

Now, the way you hold on to the golf club will have a massive influence over the direction and the power that you can hit the golf ball. So we know that we've got to have a good grip. But there's one or two variations within the grip that you'll often see a lot of players adapting.

When you hold onto the golf club, we know that the left hand or the right hand of the golfer goes at the top, the right hand goes underneath. There's really three options. You've got a baseball grip, a vardon grip or an interlinking grip.

Now, I would suggest you don't use the baseball grip unless you have very short, very fat fingers that struggle to actually link together in some way. But the baseball grip tends to use both hands as two separate units and they have a bit too much individual movement between them but that swing together is a unit. So I would rather you adapt it – adopt it, sorry, on either an overlapping or an interlinking grip. And this is the process of left hand going on, right hand little finger sitting on top of the left hand, and the left finger curving around. Or take that finger out and interlink the fingers together.

Now, you'll often find that one of those feels is more comfortable than the other one, and as long as the hands from above stay in a similar position – you see my hands don't really change shape that much, put my fingers at the back crossing over – as long as the above-grip position doesn't look like it's changing too much, I would rather you go with the most comfortable.

If I'm perfectly honest with you, I'll play with the vardon grip. But most people I teach prefer an interlinking grip, and I don't really have any preference over that. Just whatever works best for yourself. There's a theory that says the interlinking grip works better for people with short fingers or people that don't have much forearms strength.

But you look at Jack Nicholas' interlinking grip, Tiger Woods' interlinking grip as well and a lot of ladies playing on the all-PJ taught interlinking grip also. So I don't really have a persuasion over whether it's better for one type of person or other type of person. Just go with what feels most comfortable for yourself. But try and avoid the baseball grip if at all cost. Go for an interlink or an overlapping grip and hopefully that will help you hit the ball straight and further every time.

2012-05-09

Now, the way you hold on to the golf club will have a massive influence over the direction and the power that you can hit the golf ball. So we know that we've got to have a good grip. But there's one or two variations within the grip that you'll often see a lot of players adapting.

When you hold onto the golf club, we know that the left hand or the right hand of the golfer goes at the top, the right hand goes underneath. There's really three options. You've got a baseball grip, a vardon grip or an interlinking grip.

Now, I would suggest you don't use the baseball grip unless you have very short, very fat fingers that struggle to actually link together in some way. But the baseball grip tends to use both hands as two separate units and they have a bit too much individual movement between them but that swing together is a unit. So I would rather you adapt it – adopt it, sorry, on either an overlapping or an interlinking grip. And this is the process of left hand going on, right hand little finger sitting on top of the left hand, and the left finger curving around. Or take that finger out and interlink the fingers together.

Now, you'll often find that one of those feels is more comfortable than the other one, and as long as the hands from above stay in a similar position – you see my hands don't really change shape that much, put my fingers at the back crossing over – as long as the above-grip position doesn't look like it's changing too much, I would rather you go with the most comfortable.

If I'm perfectly honest with you, I'll play with the vardon grip. But most people I teach prefer an interlinking grip, and I don't really have any preference over that. Just whatever works best for yourself. There's a theory that says the interlinking grip works better for people with short fingers or people that don't have much forearms strength.

But you look at Jack Nicholas' interlinking grip, Tiger Woods' interlinking grip as well and a lot of ladies playing on the all-PJ taught interlinking grip also. So I don't really have a persuasion over whether it's better for one type of person or other type of person. Just go with what feels most comfortable for yourself. But try and avoid the baseball grip if at all cost. Go for an interlink or an overlapping grip and hopefully that will help you hit the ball straight and further every time.