Steve Stricker Firm Wrists Throughout Golf Swing (Video)
Steve Stricker Firm Wrists Throughout Golf Swing (Video)

If we look at a golfer like Steve Stricker, it’s always interesting to look at these different golfers and see what we can learn from them. Somebody like Steve Stricker interesting player, interestingly, he is the only persons to win the PGA Tour, Comeback Player of the Year twice. So, twice he has been good enough and then not good enough and then back to being good enough to actually win the award twice. And most of the really good golf he has been playing is actually since he has turned 40. So, he is playing some incredible golf, later on in his career.

Now most people would suggest that Steve Stricker’s real plus points, real good thing about his game, the way he makes the money, is actually on putting green. And I have done a few videos in the past about how he keeps his left wrist really high and arch in the putting stroke and very little wrist hinge in the putting stroke. But actually this video, I want to talk to you about how he uses very little wrist hinge actually during his full swing. He doesn’t hit some of the, sort of key positions that I would often teach golfers to do and certainly when you watch the best players in the world, you will see some key areas. And Steve Stricker doesn’t quite have those key markers. And here is why that could benefit your game as well. So, what we see with Steve Stricker particularly is during his back swing, he doesn’t set the club to this kind of traditional L-shape 90 degrees, left-arm horizontal shaft vertical position. I mean he doesn’t release the golf club through to that same position either. Because Stricker is quite a stiff wristed player, during the backswing movement he has very little wrist hinge and at this height when the left arm gets to horizontal, he is more like 45 degrees with the golf club and not traditional 90. Because of the lack of wrist hinge here, little bit left wrist hinge at the top, some would say that allows for less clubhead speed on the downswing. Stricker is not one of the longest hitters, on tour hits at average about 288 of the tee which is well down into the hundreds in terms of how far he ranked on driving distance. But he is quite accurate of the tee and that’s the benefit of his game, because if you don’t have so much wrist hinge here, you don’t have so much wrist hinge in leg to get rid of so you don’t need to be quite so flakey at the ball. So, you might lose a bit of clubhead speed but gain accuracy. And really that’s the tradeoff that a lot of club golfers and amateurs golfers might look to do. So, if you could do less wrist hinge here, less here, less coming down, you have got less wrist hinge to get rid off and actually you might find that you gain accuracy. So, if you have got distance in abundance, but you are not very accurate of the tee maybe copying the Steve Stricker limited wrist hinge might be something you could consider bringing into your game.
2016-04-15

If we look at a golfer like Steve Stricker, it’s always interesting to look at these different golfers and see what we can learn from them. Somebody like Steve Stricker interesting player, interestingly, he is the only persons to win the PGA Tour, Comeback Player of the Year twice. So, twice he has been good enough and then not good enough and then back to being good enough to actually win the award twice. And most of the really good golf he has been playing is actually since he has turned 40. So, he is playing some incredible golf, later on in his career.

Now most people would suggest that Steve Stricker’s real plus points, real good thing about his game, the way he makes the money, is actually on putting green. And I have done a few videos in the past about how he keeps his left wrist really high and arch in the putting stroke and very little wrist hinge in the putting stroke. But actually this video, I want to talk to you about how he uses very little wrist hinge actually during his full swing. He doesn’t hit some of the, sort of key positions that I would often teach golfers to do and certainly when you watch the best players in the world, you will see some key areas. And Steve Stricker doesn’t quite have those key markers. And here is why that could benefit your game as well. So, what we see with Steve Stricker particularly is during his back swing, he doesn’t set the club to this kind of traditional L-shape 90 degrees, left-arm horizontal shaft vertical position. I mean he doesn’t release the golf club through to that same position either. Because Stricker is quite a stiff wristed player, during the backswing movement he has very little wrist hinge and at this height when the left arm gets to horizontal, he is more like 45 degrees with the golf club and not traditional 90. Because of the lack of wrist hinge here, little bit left wrist hinge at the top, some would say that allows for less clubhead speed on the downswing. Stricker is not one of the longest hitters, on tour hits at average about 288 of the tee which is well down into the hundreds in terms of how far he ranked on driving distance. But he is quite accurate of the tee and that’s the benefit of his game, because if you don’t have so much wrist hinge here, you don’t have so much wrist hinge in leg to get rid of so you don’t need to be quite so flakey at the ball. So, you might lose a bit of clubhead speed but gain accuracy. And really that’s the tradeoff that a lot of club golfers and amateurs golfers might look to do. So, if you could do less wrist hinge here, less here, less coming down, you have got less wrist hinge to get rid off and actually you might find that you gain accuracy. So, if you have got distance in abundance, but you are not very accurate of the tee maybe copying the Steve Stricker limited wrist hinge might be something you could consider bringing into your game.