Likely Causes Of Your Golf Divots Being Too Deep (Video)
Likely Causes Of Your Golf Divots Being Too Deep (Video)

So hopefully, we've now established the concept that you should be taking divots when you are hitting your irons and particular your short irons. There should be small piece of turf flying up off the ground after you've hit the golf ball.

One of things we got to focus on those if the divot is too deep and it's too aggressive, what could you be doing in your swing that’s making this issue become of a problem and how can we get you out of this problem. So divot is too deep, there is one way when you hit the ground, you really feel like club slowdown excessively and it feels quite stuck in the floor and a big lump of turf flies out and sometimes the ball won’t quite fly as far as it should and/or you would start to feel a little bit of pressure in your wrists after a big practice session and after 50 balls of taking deep divots you start to feel it in your hands and your forearms, that would be a problem taking too deep a divot. Now one of the issues that we can relate to here is the fact that during your swing you stay with too much body weight over your front leg, so during the setup you should feel largely 50-50 for an iron, you make a little back swing, your body weight should move to your right then drive to your left as a right handed golfer. But if your body weight stays on your left leg the whole time and you turn to the left and then stay on the left side too much, you could feel that you are getting very steeply down into the golf ball charging that club down into the ground and just gauging out to a big piece of turf, that's going to be a problem for us. It's almost this concept that instead of landing the plane and the plane taking off again you are just crashing the plane down into the floor, the club comes down into the floor and just sticks in the ground that's going to be too deep a divot and that's going to be too much of a problem. Other issues that you could have that are causing that problem is a lack of upper body rotation. So during the swing, we should be turning the body to the right and then turning back to the left. If your upper body isn't rotating enough you just feel that you get a bit hands and arms from this angle, the club just gets lifted up and quite steep, if that feels like if you swing and you don't feel like you turn your upper body, you just life the club and throw the club back down again. You could really find that you are getting quite steep, deep divots, too much turf after the ball. Another issue to look at, related to that same issue really is a lack of lower body rotation, so during the swing we'd like to get to the top and then really drive the lower body quite hard into the left side to get a nice impact position, a nice angle of attack, angle of attack refers to how the club downs into the ball, we don't want it to be too steep. If my lower body doesn't work correctly, I lift the club up and then I just drop the club down to the back of the ball. I could find that if I haven't driven my center of gravity to the left, as a right-handed golfer to the left and I've just stood back behind the ball throwing the club down, I'm going to be quite heavy, quite fat, quite steep, quite far behind the ball. All those problems are going to create a divot sort of too big and aren’t translating the power of the club onto the ball correctly. Work on improving those three areas and see how taking the right size divot can improve your game.
2016-08-22

So hopefully, we've now established the concept that you should be taking divots when you are hitting your irons and particular your short irons. There should be small piece of turf flying up off the ground after you've hit the golf ball.

One of things we got to focus on those if the divot is too deep and it's too aggressive, what could you be doing in your swing that’s making this issue become of a problem and how can we get you out of this problem. So divot is too deep, there is one way when you hit the ground, you really feel like club slowdown excessively and it feels quite stuck in the floor and a big lump of turf flies out and sometimes the ball won’t quite fly as far as it should and/or you would start to feel a little bit of pressure in your wrists after a big practice session and after 50 balls of taking deep divots you start to feel it in your hands and your forearms, that would be a problem taking too deep a divot. Now one of the issues that we can relate to here is the fact that during your swing you stay with too much body weight over your front leg, so during the setup you should feel largely 50-50 for an iron, you make a little back swing, your body weight should move to your right then drive to your left as a right handed golfer. But if your body weight stays on your left leg the whole time and you turn to the left and then stay on the left side too much, you could feel that you are getting very steeply down into the golf ball charging that club down into the ground and just gauging out to a big piece of turf, that's going to be a problem for us. It's almost this concept that instead of landing the plane and the plane taking off again you are just crashing the plane down into the floor, the club comes down into the floor and just sticks in the ground that's going to be too deep a divot and that's going to be too much of a problem. Other issues that you could have that are causing that problem is a lack of upper body rotation. So during the swing, we should be turning the body to the right and then turning back to the left. If your upper body isn't rotating enough you just feel that you get a bit hands and arms from this angle, the club just gets lifted up and quite steep, if that feels like if you swing and you don't feel like you turn your upper body, you just life the club and throw the club back down again. You could really find that you are getting quite steep, deep divots, too much turf after the ball. Another issue to look at, related to that same issue really is a lack of lower body rotation, so during the swing we'd like to get to the top and then really drive the lower body quite hard into the left side to get a nice impact position, a nice angle of attack, angle of attack refers to how the club downs into the ball, we don't want it to be too steep. If my lower body doesn't work correctly, I lift the club up and then I just drop the club down to the back of the ball. I could find that if I haven't driven my center of gravity to the left, as a right-handed golfer to the left and I've just stood back behind the ball throwing the club down, I'm going to be quite heavy, quite fat, quite steep, quite far behind the ball. All those problems are going to create a divot sort of too big and aren’t translating the power of the club onto the ball correctly. Work on improving those three areas and see how taking the right size divot can improve your game.