How to Stop Coming Over the Top - Golf (Video)
How to Stop Coming Over the Top - Golf (Video) Now, if you ever tried to work on improving your golf, you've probably come across the concept of hitting a slice and probably come across the terminology of being over-the-top. So let's look at what over-the-top means first and then how we can stop it. So over-the-top, if I just spin around here, refers to the swing path and plain going back and then how you downswing would be in front of that path or plain. So the club doesn't come up and down on the same line. It comes up and then in front or over the top of that original line. Over the top of the ball, hitting from out to in, mainly resulting in pull shots or slice shots. Now, the reason for that is this. In your backswing, you turn your shoulders, then you lift your arms. Now, if you turned your shoulders, and now drop your arms, you would've come over the top. And that's a very simplistic view of looking at why most golfers hit from out to in or from over-the-top. From the top of the swing, their body turns too quickly, their hands throw over the top, and then we're in trouble. And it's trying to generate par in that first pitch of the swing that causes the problem. So a really nice cure and a really nice way to think about stopping this is from a good set position. Make your normal backswing and just pause. Count for two seconds—one, two—and then start the downswing. And by just giving yourself a time to pause and think at the top, you should resist the temptation to spin the upper body to smash down hard on the ball. You can still create power but it's just creating power in a different fashion. It's creating power by turning the bottom half first rather than throwing the hands forwards. So nicely to the top—one, two—move the left hip out the way and bring the club down better. A lot of golfers know the right moves they should be making, but they struggle to make it because from the top, they get too aggressive with the hands and the arms and the club comes over the top. So slicing or pulling the golf ball is your fault. Consider that over-the-top is probably the reason for that fault. And that little exercise is a nice way of stopping that and coming a little bit more inside. 2012-05-09

Now, if you ever tried to work on improving your golf, you've probably come across the concept of hitting a slice and probably come across the terminology of being over-the-top. So let's look at what over-the-top means first and then how we can stop it. So over-the-top, if I just spin around here, refers to the swing path and plain going back and then how you downswing would be in front of that path or plain. So the club doesn't come up and down on the same line. It comes up and then in front or over the top of that original line. Over the top of the ball, hitting from out to in, mainly resulting in pull shots or slice shots. Now, the reason for that is this. In your backswing, you turn your shoulders, then you lift your arms. Now, if you turned your shoulders, and now drop your arms, you would've come over the top. And that's a very simplistic view of looking at why most golfers hit from out to in or from over-the-top. From the top of the swing, their body turns too quickly, their hands throw over the top, and then we're in trouble. And it's trying to generate par in that first pitch of the swing that causes the problem. So a really nice cure and a really nice way to think about stopping this is from a good set position. Make your normal backswing and just pause. Count for two seconds—one, two—and then start the downswing. And by just giving yourself a time to pause and think at the top, you should resist the temptation to spin the upper body to smash down hard on the ball. You can still create power but it's just creating power in a different fashion. It's creating power by turning the bottom half first rather than throwing the hands forwards. So nicely to the top—one, two—move the left hip out the way and bring the club down better. A lot of golfers know the right moves they should be making, but they struggle to make it because from the top, they get too aggressive with the hands and the arms and the club comes over the top. So slicing or pulling the golf ball is your fault. Consider that over-the-top is probably the reason for that fault. And that little exercise is a nice way of stopping that and coming a little bit more inside.