Mike Weir Pro Golfer, Swing Sequence (Video)
Mike Weir Pro Golfer, Swing Sequence (Video)

There must be something about Augusta National where they play the Masters, it really suites the left hander’s. We are now going to look at Mike Weir swing analysis and again he’s won the masters 2003, since then we’ve had Mickelson, we’ve had Bubba Watson. So they really obviously like the left hander’s going around the master’s. Maybe it’s the shape of the golf course, I don’t know. But I remember sitting and watching Mike Weir win that Masters Tournament and one thing really stroke me about his approach to playing that golf course was he had this one piece take away.

The other is one piece take away drill as well and it was his little pre-shock routine and he stuck to it from the Thursday morning, right the way through to the Sunday afternoon, from first round to playing the 18th under pressure, always had the same pre-shock routine. And if you could take the advice of that, that one thing that you take on the golf course should be really simple, really clear, really precise and repeated from the first hole to the last hole whether it’s the first round on a Thursday or the final round on a Sunday keep making that same piece.

If it works for you, stick with it. For Mike Weir it was the fact that when he gets into a good address position, he took the club back in a one piece fashion, checked if he was in position, brought it back down again and then got on and hit the golf ball. He didn’t waste too much time. He had the little check point their happy, straight up and hit the golf ball. And he obviously was working on something within his swing that just meant if he got to that position he knew he could trust the rest of his golf swing to work nicely.

So if you could take one thought out on the golf course out with you, I would encourage you to go ahead and do that. Try not to get too complicated. Try not to get 15 different swings, 15 different movements in your head and then try and take that on the golf course. So in your practice session, maybe the last 25 balls before you go out on the golf course, you settle on one key thought. One thought that is working for you, one thought that is giving you the consistency in the ball flight.

You make that one consistent move. You check over and over again and then you go out and play it. It might not be this back swing position, it might be another part of your swing, but if you have one consistent thought, not too many different ideas in your head when you go and play, that like it proved nicely for Mike Weir in 2003 when he won the Masters, that should help you produce your best golf out on the golf course.

[playerProfile url="https://golf-info-guide.com/pga-players/mike-weir/"][/playerProfile]
2013-07-10

There must be something about Augusta National where they play the Masters, it really suites the left hander’s. We are now going to look at Mike Weir swing analysis and again he’s won the masters 2003, since then we’ve had Mickelson, we’ve had Bubba Watson. So they really obviously like the left hander’s going around the master’s. Maybe it’s the shape of the golf course, I don’t know. But I remember sitting and watching Mike Weir win that Masters Tournament and one thing really stroke me about his approach to playing that golf course was he had this one piece take away.

The other is one piece take away drill as well and it was his little pre-shock routine and he stuck to it from the Thursday morning, right the way through to the Sunday afternoon, from first round to playing the 18th under pressure, always had the same pre-shock routine. And if you could take the advice of that, that one thing that you take on the golf course should be really simple, really clear, really precise and repeated from the first hole to the last hole whether it’s the first round on a Thursday or the final round on a Sunday keep making that same piece.

If it works for you, stick with it. For Mike Weir it was the fact that when he gets into a good address position, he took the club back in a one piece fashion, checked if he was in position, brought it back down again and then got on and hit the golf ball. He didn’t waste too much time. He had the little check point their happy, straight up and hit the golf ball. And he obviously was working on something within his swing that just meant if he got to that position he knew he could trust the rest of his golf swing to work nicely.

So if you could take one thought out on the golf course out with you, I would encourage you to go ahead and do that. Try not to get too complicated. Try not to get 15 different swings, 15 different movements in your head and then try and take that on the golf course. So in your practice session, maybe the last 25 balls before you go out on the golf course, you settle on one key thought. One thought that is working for you, one thought that is giving you the consistency in the ball flight.

You make that one consistent move. You check over and over again and then you go out and play it. It might not be this back swing position, it might be another part of your swing, but if you have one consistent thought, not too many different ideas in your head when you go and play, that like it proved nicely for Mike Weir in 2003 when he won the Masters, that should help you produce your best golf out on the golf course.