Lee Trevino Pro Golfer, Swing Sequence (Video)
Lee Trevino Pro Golfer, Swing Sequence (Video)

One of the biggest and best loved characters in the game of golf over the decades has got to be Lee Trevino, great play great ball striker. They say he is one of the best ball strikers since Ben Hogan and that was proven out by winning all four -- sorry three of the four major championships. And he won those three all of them twice. So, it’s six majors over his career. But not necessarily the archetypal best golf swing. Couple of a little tweaks and works in his golf swing that weren’t necessarily the things that I would encourage you to copy. Particular he had very soft leg action, very aggressive leg action and actually quite a bowed left wrist.

So if we analyze that in a bit more detail we can work out the good bits and the bad bits of that. When Trevino sets out to the golf ball, a little bit hunched in the posture as you’d expect his age gets the best of him he has a little bit of a hunch here. But at the top of the back swing, the club face gets a bit closed and the left wrist gets very bowed. You should yourself try and work on keeping that left just a little bit flatter and straighter which would actually produce the club face that mimics your left forearm angle better.

Having the clubface close like this would produce quite a few draw or even hook shots. We would expect the club face to come down a little bit closed and send the ball too far down the left side. So, it worked for Trevino, you shift the club face a little bit too much on the way back with a bowed left wrist then worked hard to keep it open during the down swing but for yourself try and play the left wrist a little bit straighter on the way back without hooking it over quite so much. And the best practice he said that, he says I’m setting up here put a mirror where the camera is and just check that the club comes back into the right position and doesn’t bow down quite so much. The other thing that Trevino was guilty of was being very aggressive with his legs.

That produced quite a lot of power for him and he was a very good ball striker but for a lot of golfers, they would actually strike the ball quite poorly if they had so much left leg action, particularly when we see the left knee dip in and get forged too much. So Trevino’s left knee is down in this position pushing forwards and getting in front of the shoe laces. The modern golf swing theory and certainly something I would advocate is having a much stronger left leg through the impact phase.

Snapping the left foot back -- snapping the left knee back, keeping a lot of body weight on to the left side and actually having a flatter left foot through impact. That I think would provide more stability and a little bit more balance and hopefully more consistency. But the bowed left wrist and the excessive knee action is one of the unique things about Trevino’s game, but not necessarily something that most club golfers should aim to copy.

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2013-07-02

One of the biggest and best loved characters in the game of golf over the decades has got to be Lee Trevino, great play great ball striker. They say he is one of the best ball strikers since Ben Hogan and that was proven out by winning all four -- sorry three of the four major championships. And he won those three all of them twice. So, it’s six majors over his career. But not necessarily the archetypal best golf swing. Couple of a little tweaks and works in his golf swing that weren’t necessarily the things that I would encourage you to copy. Particular he had very soft leg action, very aggressive leg action and actually quite a bowed left wrist.

So if we analyze that in a bit more detail we can work out the good bits and the bad bits of that. When Trevino sets out to the golf ball, a little bit hunched in the posture as you’d expect his age gets the best of him he has a little bit of a hunch here. But at the top of the back swing, the club face gets a bit closed and the left wrist gets very bowed. You should yourself try and work on keeping that left just a little bit flatter and straighter which would actually produce the club face that mimics your left forearm angle better.

Having the clubface close like this would produce quite a few draw or even hook shots. We would expect the club face to come down a little bit closed and send the ball too far down the left side. So, it worked for Trevino, you shift the club face a little bit too much on the way back with a bowed left wrist then worked hard to keep it open during the down swing but for yourself try and play the left wrist a little bit straighter on the way back without hooking it over quite so much. And the best practice he said that, he says I’m setting up here put a mirror where the camera is and just check that the club comes back into the right position and doesn’t bow down quite so much. The other thing that Trevino was guilty of was being very aggressive with his legs.

That produced quite a lot of power for him and he was a very good ball striker but for a lot of golfers, they would actually strike the ball quite poorly if they had so much left leg action, particularly when we see the left knee dip in and get forged too much. So Trevino’s left knee is down in this position pushing forwards and getting in front of the shoe laces. The modern golf swing theory and certainly something I would advocate is having a much stronger left leg through the impact phase.

Snapping the left foot back -- snapping the left knee back, keeping a lot of body weight on to the left side and actually having a flatter left foot through impact. That I think would provide more stability and a little bit more balance and hopefully more consistency. But the bowed left wrist and the excessive knee action is one of the unique things about Trevino’s game, but not necessarily something that most club golfers should aim to copy.

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