Why Are Hybrid Golf Clubs Different From Long Irons (Video)
Why Are Hybrid Golf Clubs Different From Long Irons (Video)

Why are hybrid golf clubs different than long irons? Hybrid golf clubs are originally brought in to be a combination of a long iron and a fairway wood. What golfers often found was that with long irons on, long approaches into the green, if a slightly off centre here occurred, then that little reduction in distance could be quite dramatic. And the actual feel of the club, was actually sometimes a little bit painful as the club twisted as the moment of inertia was actually very, very low and forgiveness was very, very low. So that’s how hybrids were born, so they could have a little bit more forgiveness, a little bit more distance and just offer a little bit more help for people who struggle hitting the long irons. Now design-wise the main difference between this and a long iron is you got a lot more of a sole that actually get back from, and the actual perimeter waiting is able to be moved around that sole and further back from the club face. This means that if a ball is hit from the toe or from the heel it will lift up into the air and have enough to back spin to actually generate a good consistent golf shot. And you can actually play them pretty similar to how you would a long iron. So I’ve got my 3 iron replacement here, my Thomas Golf hybrid and I’m going to play this from a couple of inches inside my left heel, and I’m going to approach it as I would a normal long iron shot. So I’m just going to try and hit and the ball and then just bruise the ground after it, I don’t want to be taking a divot, but I just want to be bruising the ground after the ball. So hybrids were brought in to kind of help replace long irons and there are quite a few differences in the design. If you haven’t tried a hybrid out already, give it a go and you could find those long irons are a thing of the past.

2014-10-22

Why are hybrid golf clubs different than long irons? Hybrid golf clubs are originally brought in to be a combination of a long iron and a fairway wood. What golfers often found was that with long irons on, long approaches into the green, if a slightly off centre here occurred, then that little reduction in distance could be quite dramatic. And the actual feel of the club, was actually sometimes a little bit painful as the club twisted as the moment of inertia was actually very, very low and forgiveness was very, very low. So that’s how hybrids were born, so they could have a little bit more forgiveness, a little bit more distance and just offer a little bit more help for people who struggle hitting the long irons. Now design-wise the main difference between this and a long iron is you got a lot more of a sole that actually get back from, and the actual perimeter waiting is able to be moved around that sole and further back from the club face. This means that if a ball is hit from the toe or from the heel it will lift up into the air and have enough to back spin to actually generate a good consistent golf shot. And you can actually play them pretty similar to how you would a long iron. So I’ve got my 3 iron replacement here, my Thomas Golf hybrid and I’m going to play this from a couple of inches inside my left heel, and I’m going to approach it as I would a normal long iron shot. So I’m just going to try and hit and the ball and then just bruise the ground after it, I don’t want to be taking a divot, but I just want to be bruising the ground after the ball. So hybrids were brought in to kind of help replace long irons and there are quite a few differences in the design. If you haven’t tried a hybrid out already, give it a go and you could find those long irons are a thing of the past.