How to Select a Putting Style (Video)
How to Select a Putting Style (Video) Most people, when they start of playing the game of golf, they're going to start off with a fairly traditional putter and a fairly traditional putting style. It's just the putter that comes with your first set or your first golf teacher or the person that lets you play golf, would probably encourage you to play with a fairly traditional sort of grip and fairly traditional putting style. But when you actually start to look at the golfers that are playing on the PGA Tour, you'll realize that there's more than one way to putt and after when golfers looked at everything, well, why are they doing something that I'm not? Should I try and do that? But actually when you try to make the change to a mid-length or a longer putter, it can be quite difficult. Firstly, it will feel worse and probably you'll putt worst than you actually do in your normal club because you're trying something for the first time. There's also a little bit of a stigma attached to it that. Well, you've changed from this to this and we're expecting you to be twice as good a putter as you were before and as soon as you miss a putt, oh, it's because you've got that daft long putter that you can't putt with. So, I would encourage you to experiment with changing to a mid or long length putter, particularly if you really struggling with the shorter putter. Now, the mid and long length putters work nicely because they eliminate any real breakdown or wrist hinge that you might be prone to with a shorter putter. So if with the short putter, you have an issue with flicking or having too much hand action with your putter effectively, you're causing yourself the yips. Moving to a mid-length putter, might be a nice decision. Mid-length is going to be around about 43 inches long and it gives you the opportunity to anchor the putter into the middle part of your body, yet still swinging with the same grip and the same stroke. So, I placed the putter into my belt buckle on my midriff here then gripping the club as normal, go ahead and make my normal stroke. But here, I can't really use my wrist all that much because I have an extra anchoring point in my chest. If I was to use my wrist to flick, you can see how the top end of the club wobbles, but if that's anchored into my body then I can just rock that through evenly. That would give me a little bit more control over the club, particularly if I've got an opening and closing wristy flicky stroke or a longer length putter rather club would be sort of anchored into the sternum, I need a bit longer putty here, but anchored into the sternum and then again, backwards and forwards here. That angle is no wrist hinge at all. It's a very different grip from an old putting stroke by having a long putter like that. It also works quite well if you've struggled with backaches or if bending over to a normal putter or mid-length putter gives you back problems. Standing up nice and tall, again anchoring the putter into your chest and then backwards and forwards with a long length putter might work. If you consider looking at thomasgolf.com, you actually have lots of different options for different lengths of putters. So, have a go at experimenting and if you're struggling with your own putting technique, have a look at a long or a medium length putter and see how that helps improve your game. 2012-08-07

Most people, when they start of playing the game of golf, they're going to start off with a fairly traditional putter and a fairly traditional putting style. It's just the putter that comes with your first set or your first golf teacher or the person that lets you play golf, would probably encourage you to play with a fairly traditional sort of grip and fairly traditional putting style. But when you actually start to look at the golfers that are playing on the PGA Tour, you'll realize that there's more than one way to putt and after when golfers looked at everything, well, why are they doing something that I'm not? Should I try and do that?

But actually when you try to make the change to a mid-length or a longer putter, it can be quite difficult. Firstly, it will feel worse and probably you'll putt worst than you actually do in your normal club because you're trying something for the first time. There's also a little bit of a stigma attached to it that. Well, you've changed from this to this and we're expecting you to be twice as good a putter as you were before and as soon as you miss a putt, oh, it's because you've got that daft long putter that you can't putt with. So, I would encourage you to experiment with changing to a mid or long length putter, particularly if you really struggling with the shorter putter.

Now, the mid and long length putters work nicely because they eliminate any real breakdown or wrist hinge that you might be prone to with a shorter putter. So if with the short putter, you have an issue with flicking or having too much hand action with your putter effectively, you're causing yourself the yips. Moving to a mid-length putter, might be a nice decision. Mid-length is going to be around about 43 inches long and it gives you the opportunity to anchor the putter into the middle part of your body, yet still swinging with the same grip and the same stroke.

So, I placed the putter into my belt buckle on my midriff here then gripping the club as normal, go ahead and make my normal stroke. But here, I can't really use my wrist all that much because I have an extra anchoring point in my chest. If I was to use my wrist to flick, you can see how the top end of the club wobbles, but if that's anchored into my body then I can just rock that through evenly. That would give me a little bit more control over the club, particularly if I've got an opening and closing wristy flicky stroke or a longer length putter rather club would be sort of anchored into the sternum, I need a bit longer putty here, but anchored into the sternum and then again, backwards and forwards here.

That angle is no wrist hinge at all. It's a very different grip from an old putting stroke by having a long putter like that. It also works quite well if you've struggled with backaches or if bending over to a normal putter or mid-length putter gives you back problems. Standing up nice and tall, again anchoring the putter into your chest and then backwards and forwards with a long length putter might work.

If you consider looking at thomasgolf.com, you actually have lots of different options for different lengths of putters. So, have a go at experimenting and if you're struggling with your own putting technique, have a look at a long or a medium length putter and see how that helps improve your game.