Using Notes And Feedback To Improve Your Distance Control On The Golf Course (Video)
Using Notes And Feedback To Improve Your Distance Control On The Golf Course (Video)

As a golfer trying to improve your game, you should be using feedback all of the time. So feedback is simple things like how did that shot feel? How did my swing feel? What did my shot do if I tried this differently in my game? But more importantly sort of structured feedback would be things like making notes, during a round during a practice session or even after the round and particularly relating to club selection and elevation changes. Making notes is going to be super important in getting the best feedback. So that next time you go on the golf course and play again with elevation changes, you have got some structure, some idea of which clubs to be using.

So for example most club golfers are going to have a rough idea of how far they hit certain shots. And if you are playing the same golf course over and over again you might appreciate that I hit at 157-iron let’s just say for an example, it’s a round about what most golfers do. So I hit at 157-iron but on this particular hole, I am always short, well why you are always short on that hole? Is it because it goes uphill and if it is because it goes uphill, you need to know roughly how high that hill is and how short you are. And if the hill is going up by about 15-feet for example and your shot is always coming up 10 yard shorter than you think it should be then you can make a mental notes of that, you can just jot that down in notebook, it says 15-feet elevation change results in 10 yards less. Therefore on hole #7 hit a 6-iron instead to get it, to go that far. And if it’s changing the distance that it’s going up, chances are if it descends, it’s going to change by roughly the same amount. So if on another hole later on, on the golf course you have got it shot downhill into a green, and you forever going over the back of that green, make some notes, either mentally or actually physically in a notebook that says on this hole certain things happen and normally over the back of the green because the descending heights. Then take that notebook in your golf bag so when you go to a different golf course and you arrive and you look out on to the golf course, and it’s ups and down and hills and slopes you make those mental notes again if I am faced within uphill shot, I need to allow about 10 yards to every 15-feet elevation change up and down, I need to allow one more club. Now when you are on the course, and is that yardage, okay I have got 150 flag, but it’s uphill because I have made those notes mentally and also physically in my notebook, I am reminded of what I need to allow for I can then select the right club to hit the right shots. There is no point as a golfer to keep making the same mistake over and over again without learning from it. So making notes in your notebook is a great way of getting feedback so you can learn from your mistakes.
2016-10-17

As a golfer trying to improve your game, you should be using feedback all of the time. So feedback is simple things like how did that shot feel? How did my swing feel? What did my shot do if I tried this differently in my game? But more importantly sort of structured feedback would be things like making notes, during a round during a practice session or even after the round and particularly relating to club selection and elevation changes. Making notes is going to be super important in getting the best feedback. So that next time you go on the golf course and play again with elevation changes, you have got some structure, some idea of which clubs to be using.

So for example most club golfers are going to have a rough idea of how far they hit certain shots. And if you are playing the same golf course over and over again you might appreciate that I hit at 157-iron let’s just say for an example, it’s a round about what most golfers do. So I hit at 157-iron but on this particular hole, I am always short, well why you are always short on that hole? Is it because it goes uphill and if it is because it goes uphill, you need to know roughly how high that hill is and how short you are. And if the hill is going up by about 15-feet for example and your shot is always coming up 10 yard shorter than you think it should be then you can make a mental notes of that, you can just jot that down in notebook, it says 15-feet elevation change results in 10 yards less. Therefore on hole #7 hit a 6-iron instead to get it, to go that far. And if it’s changing the distance that it’s going up, chances are if it descends, it’s going to change by roughly the same amount. So if on another hole later on, on the golf course you have got it shot downhill into a green, and you forever going over the back of that green, make some notes, either mentally or actually physically in a notebook that says on this hole certain things happen and normally over the back of the green because the descending heights. Then take that notebook in your golf bag so when you go to a different golf course and you arrive and you look out on to the golf course, and it’s ups and down and hills and slopes you make those mental notes again if I am faced within uphill shot, I need to allow about 10 yards to every 15-feet elevation change up and down, I need to allow one more club. Now when you are on the course, and is that yardage, okay I have got 150 flag, but it’s uphill because I have made those notes mentally and also physically in my notebook, I am reminded of what I need to allow for I can then select the right club to hit the right shots. There is no point as a golfer to keep making the same mistake over and over again without learning from it. So making notes in your notebook is a great way of getting feedback so you can learn from your mistakes.