should i take lessons

The golfer who's eager to improve can get help from many sources.

For those who don't have time for one-on-one lessons with a PGA professional, resources like Golf-Info-Guide.com make an excellent substitute. Take notes as you read the tips and watch the videos, then practice what you've learned on the Driving Range Tips. In fact, you can practice many of the tips and drills in your home or back yard. For example, all you need is a mirror to work on your golf stance and posture.

It's also a good idea to research good instruction books, manuals, and magazines. Search online for material that is well reviewed and if you get a chance, ask more experienced players about some of the resources that they've used. If you can, though, avoid trying to teach yourself golf without any guidance. Many self-taught golfers develop bad habits, which can prove difficult to get rid of. It's much easier to start with a solid swing foundation than to correct bad habits later on.

It's usually best to decline on-course lessons from your friends, too. First off, the course isn't the place to try new things; that's what the range is for. Second, just because something works for their game doesn't mean it will work for yours. It's OK to accept occasional advice from a friend who's a very good golfer and/or highly knowledgeable about the swing, but laying the groundwork for a sound swing is best done with professional help.

Remember, too, that after you've taken lessons to not rely completely on the instructor to make you better. You still must continue to work on the swing thoughts that have proved helpful before you will start to see the improvements you're looking for.

Tips for Golf Lessons:

  • Read online reviews on local PGA-certified professional teachers.
  • Many pros offer group lessons at discounted prices, and keep your eyes open for free clinics.
  • Take notes from online tips and videos, then take them to the range to reference while practicing.

Beginner Golf Tips – Should I Take Golf Lessons?

Beginner Golf Tips – Should I Take Golf Lessons?



If you are just getting started in the game of golf, congratulations are in order – golf is an exciting game, and you are in for many ups and downs along the way. There are going to be some frustrations, to be sure, but the good moments should far outweigh the bad. You will find that there is a tremendous sense of accomplishment available in this game when you reach a new milestone or hit a great shot. It is possible to feel so accomplished because you know just how difficult it is to reach those moments. Stick with your game even through the struggles and you will be quite proud of yourself when all is said and done.

Of course, there is a lot of work to be done before you can arrive at a place where you are checking off golf achievements and reaching new goals. Before any of that can occur, you are going to have to learn the basics of playing this great game. There is a lot to learn, as this is one of the most complicated and challenging games in the world. With that in mind, many beginning golfers wonder whether or not they should take lessons from a teaching professional to speed up the learning process. Golf lessons cost money, of course, and they take up some of your time, so you should be sure of your decision before moving forward.

For most people, the right answer to the question posed in the title of this article is yes – it is a good idea to take golf lessons. As a beginner, you need to start from somewhere, as you don't want to build your game on faulty fundamentals. Even if you only take a single lesson to get yourself started, the knowledge you gain from that lesson could easily stick with you for years. While they do require some monetary investment, paying for a lesson or two is rather affordable in the grand scheme of this game. Put another way, you are unlikely to regret taking a golf lesson. As long as you find a good teacher – more on that later – you will come away with a wealth of information that will take much of the mystery out of playing good golf.

In this article, we are going to cover just about everything you could need to know about taking a golf lesson as a beginner. You might be a bit intimidated at first to head out to a golf course for a lesson when you don't have any prior experience, but put those feelings to the side right away. All golf instructors have worked with beginners at one point or another, so you aren't going to be bringing anything that they haven't seen before. Golf is a hard game, and you shouldn't be embarrassed if you aren't very good at first – no one is.

All of the content below is based on a right-handed golfer. If you happen to play left-handed, please take a moment to reverse the directions as necessary.

Golf Lesson Basics

Golf Lesson Basics



As a total beginner, you may not even know how golf lessons work, or where you can go to find them. In this section, we are going to cover the basics of this market, before moving on to some other important information later in the article. To gain a basic understanding of how golf lessons are offered, please review the points below.

  • Typically given in a one-on-one setting. Most golf lessons are offered in a one-on-one environment, with a single golf professional and the individual taking the lesson. While there are group lessons offered on occasion at some facilities – and even golf schools – most of the learning in this game is done on an individual basis. For a beginner, we would recommend taking an individual lesson so you can have the full attention of the instructor for the entire duration of the lesson. You have a lot to learn and it will be more difficult to make progress if you are distracted by the presence of others.
  • Usually in 30-minute or 45-minute sessions. The typical golf lesson will last a half hour, although some golf teachers like to stretch it out to 45-minutes. For a beginner, a 30-minute lesson is perfect. You are going to hear a lot of information in that half hour, and you probably won't even remember all of it. Extending your lesson for 15 more minutes is unlikely to provide any more benefit, so there is no point in spending more for a longer lesson.
  • Nearly every golf facility offers lessons. You can probably take lessons at any golf facility in your area, including municipal courses, high-end public courses, driving ranges, and even some private courses offer lessons to the public. We will offer more advice later as to how you should pick your instructor, but rest assured that you will not need to go far in order to find someone willing to teach you this game. The best option for you is going to be the one which provides the right combination of a convenient location, a qualified instructor, and an affordable rate.
  • Bring your own clubs. Generally speaking, you will be expected to bring your own golf clubs to a lesson. If you are a complete beginner and you have never even held a club before, let alone purchased a set, you may be able to use some 'loaner' clubs for the lesson. When you book a lesson, make sure to inform the instructor that you will need to borrow clubs if that is indeed the case.
  • Lesson series are usually available at a discount. If you plan on taking more than one lesson, let the instructor know and they may offer you a discounted price on a series that you can use over a period of weeks (or even months). For instance, the charge for one lesson may be $50, but you might be able to get five lessons for a total of $200. It will probably take more than one lesson for you to get up to speed as a beginner, so buying a series at a lower overall cost is a wise choice.

Golf lessons are a key part of the business model for most golf facilities, as lessons are a key income driver for the teaching pros. Working in the golf industry isn't always a lucrative venture, so most teaching pros are quite welcoming to new students. Don't be intimidated by working with someone who is an expert in the game, as they will be happy to share their knowledge with you while making some money at the same time.

Finding the Right Teacher

Finding the Right Teacher



Locating the right golf teacher is not really any different than finding any other service provider. The process starts with doing a bit of homework. You are going to want to consider a few different choices, at least, so you don't just sign up with the one who comes up first on your internet search.

To get started, make a list of all of the golf facilities within a reasonable drive of your home. You will be more likely to take lessons if they are convenient within the context of your schedule, so don't commit to a teacher who is an hour drive away unless you are sure that will work for you. Try searching online for golf facilities and then list out all that are within 15-minutes-or-so of your home or office. Depending on where you live, this might leave you with only a couple viable options – or you could have quite the long list.

Once you have a list established, it will be time to make some phone calls. While it might seem a bit old-fashioned to make phone calls instead of contacting the facilities online, you will probably have better luck getting info over the phone. When you call, ask about the instructors who offer lessons at the course or driving range. What are their rates? Do any of them specialize in working with beginners? What days and times are lessons available? Get as much information as you can and continue calling around until you fill out your list with the necessary details.

At this point, it will probably be pretty easy to make a choice. You will know what the fees look like at various locations, and you will know which teachers are available during times that match up with your schedule. Unless you have been unable to find what feels like a good fit for you, the only thing left to do is call to schedule a lesson. Most teachers are willing to schedule at least a couple weeks in advance, so call as soon as you know what time you would like to reserve. It would be best to pick a time in your schedule when you won't have to rush to and from the lesson. This will make the experience more enjoyable, and it won't be a problem if the lesson winds up running a bit long.

Of course, you are not tied to the first golf teacher you select. If you do take a lesson, and you don't feel like you 'connect' with the teacher on a level that will work over the long run, feel free to try another area teacher to see how things go. This isn't' necessarily a matter of finding the 'best' teacher so much as it is finding the best teacher for you. Everyone learns in their own way, so you need to track down a teacher who communicates in a manner that makes sense to your brain.

Before we close this section, it should be noted that you don't necessarily have to work with the highest-priced teacher in your area to get quality instruction. As a beginner, you probably aren't going to benefit much from the advanced methods that such a teacher could offer, anyway. Save your money and stick with one of the more affordable options. You will still get the help you need, and you can use your savings to play more golf.

Locating the right golf teacher is not really any different than finding any other service provider. The process starts with doing a bit of homework. You are going to want to consider a few different choices, at least, so you don't just sign up with the one who comes up first on your internet search.

To get started, make a list of all of the golf facilities within a reasonable drive of your home. You will be more likely to take lessons if they are convenient within the context of your schedule, so don't commit to a teacher who is an hour drive away unless you are sure that will work for you. Try searching online for golf facilities and then list out all that are within 15-minutes-or-so of your home or office. Depending on where you live, this might leave you with only a couple viable options – or you could have quite the long list.

Once you have a list established, it will be time to make some phone calls. While it might seem a bit old-fashioned to make phone calls instead of contacting the facilities online, you will probably have better luck getting info over the phone. When you call, ask about the instructors who offer lessons at the course or driving range. What are their rates? Do any of them specialize in working with beginners? What days and times are lessons available? Get as much information as you can and continue calling around until you fill out your list with the necessary details.

At this point, it will probably be pretty easy to make a choice. You will know what the fees look like at various locations, and you will know which teachers are available during times that match up with your schedule. Unless you have been unable to find what feels like a good fit for you, the only thing left to do is call to schedule a lesson. Most teachers are willing to schedule at least a couple weeks in advance, so call as soon as you know what time you would like to reserve. It would be best to pick a time in your schedule when you won't have to rush to and from the lesson. This will make the experience more enjoyable, and it won't be a problem if the lesson winds up running a bit long.

Of course, you are not tied to the first golf teacher you select. If you do take a lesson, and you don't feel like you 'connect' with the teacher on a level that will work over the long run, feel free to try another area teacher to see how things go. This isn't' necessarily a matter of finding the 'best' teacher so much as it is finding the best teacher for you. Everyone learns in their own way, so you need to track down a teacher who communicates in a manner that makes sense to your brain.

Before we close this section, it should be noted that you don't necessarily have to work with the highest-priced teacher in your area to get quality instruction. As a beginner, you probably aren't going to benefit much from the advanced methods that such a teacher could offer, anyway. Save your money and stick with one of the more affordable options. You will still get the help you need, and you can use your savings to play more golf.

Getting the Most Out of a Golf Lesson

Getting the Most Out of a Golf Lesson



There is something of an art to taking a golf lesson. Unfortunately, many people who take lessons – both beginners and experienced players alike – fail to act in a manner that is going to help them actually improve at this difficult game. It would be a shame to waste your time and money by not benefitting from what the teacher is trying to tell you.

So, what can do you to get the most from your golf lessons? The following list of tips should help you have a positive experience.

  • Come in with an open mind. This is by far the most important piece of the puzzle. Coming into the lesson, you need to keep your mind open and not already have preconceived notions of how you should swing the club. This is a bigger problem with experienced players than it is with beginners, but you still need to be sure to remain receptive to all instruction. Remember, the person you are learning from is a qualified professional with years of experience in this game. Trust their advice and do your best to follow along. You may find your own way to do certain things as you gain experience, but you aren't in a position to make those decisions just yet. Your best chance of being successful as you get started in golf is to put your faith in what you are being told by the golf pro.
  • Pay attention! In the modern world, it is harder and harder to find people who will pay attention for more than a minute or two at a time. Yes, cell phones are largely to blame for this phenomenon, but it is also just our culture in general. We all live busy lives, and we switch constantly from one task to the next. During your golf lesson, put your phone away and do your best to really focus on what you are being told. Some golf teachers will provide notes after the lesson is over that you can use to remember the key points, or you can just make a few notes yourself as you go along. Don't let technology or even the other people on the range distract you from the process of learning to play golf – the internet will still be there waiting for you when you are finished.
  • Don't be self-conscious. Standing in front of an experienced golf teacher as a total beginner can be a bit embarrassing when you start to hit some shots. Unfortunately, some golfers fail to get much out of their lessons because they are too worried about embarrassing themselves on the range. Put those concerns to the side as soon as possible. There is no shame in hitting bad shots, and the teacher you are learning from was once a beginner as well. Even if there are other people practicing on the range during your lesson, those people are far too worried about their own games to bother casting judgements on your ability. Do your best to leave all of these thoughts to the side while you just focus in on getting better one shot at a time.
  • Ask plenty of questions. As mentioned above, you should be trusting the golf teacher at this point in your development. With that said, you don't just have to stand there and silently nod your head the whole time. If you have questions about what you are being told, feel free to ask at any time. It is often when you ask questions that you will really get to the heart of a concept that the teacher is trying to convey. Through the course of asking questions, you will learn a lot about the golf swing, and you will pick up some of the 'lingo' as well. You don't get many chances to chat with someone who is so experienced in the game of golf, so take advantage and feel free to 'pick the brain' of your chosen golf teacher.

It isn't hard to get a lot of information out of a golf lesson, as long as you follow along with the points listed above. Of those points, the two most important ones to keep in mind are keeping an open mind and asking plenty of questions. As long as you manage to succeed with regard to those two keys, you should be well on the way to an enjoyable future on the links.

Other Beginning Golf Tips

Other Beginning Golf Tips



We believe that you will benefit from taking a golf lesson or two as a beginning player. However, taking lessons is just one stop along the way to establishing yourself as a recreational player. In this last section of the article, we are going to touch on a few other key points that you should understand as you are getting started.

  • Save your money by purchasing used equipment. There is simply no need to buy new, expensive golf equipment right away when starting out in the game. Golf gear can be quite costly, and you don't even yet know if this game is going to turn into a long-lasting hobby. Rather than getting in over your head and wasting a bunch of cash, play it safe and buy some used clubs - or, at least, affordable new clubs. It is easy to find used golf clubs online, and some golf shops even carry second-hand sets specifically for beginners. You will always be able to upgrade into a new set later on when you have a better idea of how much golf you are going to play. Also, as you learn the game, your needs for a set of clubs will change, so waiting until later to buy a nice set will allow you to have that set customize for your swing.
  • Save your money by playing cheap courses. Again, the emphasis here is on saving your golf budget at first. Are there expensive, fancy golf courses near your home? Probably – but you likely aren't good enough to appreciate those courses just yet. Rather than paying big greens fees only to pull your ball out of the hazards all day long, stick with affordable municipal courses when just getting started. You can still have plenty of fun at those facilities, and the cost of 18-hole will likely be half (or less) or what it would be at a high-end course.
  • Make friends. The social aspect of the game of golf is one of the things that keeps people coming back time after time. When you head out to the course, be open to meeting new people, whether through chatting on the range or getting paired up with them for your tee time. Even if you don't become friends, you can still learn a lot about the game by chatting with other golfers. There is an entire language associated with this game, and you will gradually pick that up over time by talking golf. If the golf course that you frequent offers a men's or women's club, consider joining and taking part in some of their events. This is an easy way to make new golf friends, and you will get to play in some fun competitions as well.

Golf is a great game – some would argue it is the greatest game in the world for recreational players. With that said, it is not the easiest game for a beginner. For example, most people would be able to join a rec softball league and have fun right away, even if they don't have great softball skills. Golf is different. You need to learn the basic techniques before you can really make your way around the course for a full 18-hole round. By taking a lesson or two from a qualified teacher, you can jumpstart your golf education and get yourself a big step closer to enjoying this hobby on a regular basis. Good luck and have fun!