Grip style: InterlockingTiger Woods interlock grip Hand position: Neutral to slightly strongneutral grip Putting grip style / hand position: Reverse overlap / neutral
Tiger Woods reverse overlap grip

Tiger Woods

No question, Tiger Woods swing is the most analyzed in golf history. Woods has fueled this cottage industry by markedly changing his swing twice (and counting) during his remarkable career.

Perhaps that’s why most analysts barely mention Tiger Woods grip when breaking down his game. Let’s take a look at the grip that makes his swing go.

Like with his idol Jack Nicklaus, Woods employs an interlocking grip rather than the Vardon or overlapping style most tour pros use. Woods has actually altered his grip position slightly over the years, ranging from neutral to mildly strong. Most recently (summer 2014), he’s moved toward the strong side.

Look closely at Woods’ setup and you’ll notice the fingers on his left hand form a nearly 90° angle to the handle and shaft. This helps him keep the club secure throughout the backswing with minimal pressure, and prevents the wrists from becoming overly active on the downswing.

As for Tiger Woods grip with the putter, it’s a conventional reverse-overlap style, right hand below the left, with both hands in a neutral or square position. He places his thumbs straight down the center of the putter grip. Woods’ grip is conducive to an arc-style putting stroke in which the face opens in relation to the target line going back, then closes after impact.

Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip