Grip style: InterlockingLuke Donald interlock grip Hand position: NeutralLuke Donald Neutral grip Putting grip style / hand position: Reverse overlap / neutralLuke Donald reverse overlap grip

    Luke Donald Grip
    His elegant finish position is one of golf’s most photogenic poses. Likewise, Luke Donald’s grip makes a frame-worthy start to the Englishman’s classic move.

    It’s no surprise that Donald’s grip reflects timeless fundamentals. His right hand is perfectly positioned on top of the handle, with the forefinger in “trigger” mode and the thumb securing the club without locking it in a death grip. Donald’s left hand mirrors the position of his right, with the back of his glove pointed essentially at the target.

    One of many world-class players to employ an interlocking grip – others include Tiger Woods and Rory McIlroy – Donald keeps his hands lightly on the club. This is nearly as important as the hands’ position, because excess tension will wreck any swing before it starts. On a scale of 1-10, aim for a grip pressure around 4 or 5.

    Donald achieves another fundamental worth striving for. At impact, his hands return to a position nearly identical to where they began the swing. This is a consistent theme among pros and better amateurs.

    While scores of pros use unconventional putting styles, Luke Donald’s grip again reflects his traditional swing technique. A standard reverse overlap with minimal hand pressure and palms in perfect harmony, the grip anchors a stroke that even his fellow tour winners envy. As well they should. Donald once went 449 consecutive holes without a single three-putt.

    That’s what a good grip can do.


Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip