Grip style: Vardon (overlapping)Vardon grip Hand position: strongstrong grip Putting grip style / hand position: Reverse overlap / neutral
    reverse overlap grip

    Kevin Na Grip
    Do not – repeat – do not emulate the pre-shot routine of this article’s subject. Kevin Na’s grip… Now there’s something worth copying.

    Perhaps better known for his sometimes excruciating waggles over the ball than for his steady play, Na grips the club just a touch on the strong side. He’s slightly built at 5’11”, 167 pounds, so this grip position helps Na squeeze a little extra power from his smooth, compact swing.

    In fact, he’s able to release the club so well through impact, Na isn’t forced to seek extra yards by extending his backswing. Hence, he drives the ball just far enough – about 280 yards on average – while hitting a solid 65% or so of fairways.

    To simulate Na’s grip, place your left hand on club and turn it to the right until you can see about 2 ½ knuckles on the back of your hand. Place the right hand so that the “V” at the base of your thumb and forefinger point just inside your right shoulder. That’s a strong – but not too strong – grip. It will not only boost your distance, it may just cure your slice.

    To make a living on the PGA TOUR, short-knockers like Na must be absolute demons around the greens. Indeed, Na routinely ranks among the leaders in “scrambling,” i.e., getting up-and-down for pars. Kevin Na’s grip with the putter is a straightforward reverse overlap.

    Most noteworthy is the distinct lack of tension in Na’s hands and arms, which helps explain his deft touch with the blade.

    And in all fairness, Na seems to have kicked his habit of incessant waggling. For that, he earns a hearty golf clap.


Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip