Grip style: Vardon (overlapping)Justin Rose Vardon grip Hand position: NeutralJustin Rose Neutral grip Putting grip style / hand position: Reverse overlap / neutral
    Justin Rose reverse overlap grip

    Justin Rose Grip
    Would a Rose with any other grip swing as sweet? Probably not.

    Englishman Justin Rose’s grip, like his technically sound yet ultra-fluid swing, is a thing of beauty. Indeed, the grip and swing go hand in hand.

    Rose holds the club in a position very near neutral, but a close look shows that his left hand is rotated to a slightly strong position (i.e., to his right). This is reflected at the top of his backswing, where the back of Rose’s left hand and wrist are a tiny bit “cupped.”

    This ever-so-slightly strong grip allows Rose to hit towering draws with his driver without too much concern of hooking the ball. Likewise, he’s able to play a fade when needed. Best of all, he sacrifices neither power nor accuracy. Hence, he’s one of the game’s best from tee to green, routinely near the top of greens in regulation percentage on the PGA TOUR.

    How does Justin Rose grip the putter? In a very traditional manner – left hand above the right on the handle, left forefinger placed lightly over the right knuckles. He does make a minor alteration, however. Much like Ernie Els, Rose puts his right pinky finger on top of (rather than next to) his left middle finger. This unites the hands even more and prevents any wrist action from creeping into the stroke.


Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip