Grip style: Vardon (overlapping)Vardon grip Hand position: NeutralNeutral grip Putting grip style / hand position: Reverse overlap
    reverse overlap grip

    David Toms Grip
    He’s the owner of a much-envied stroke, and David Toms’ grip with the putter is worth emulating, too.

    In Toms’ prime, few players in golf could rival him for putting prowess. Toms’ long, fluid stroke has produced 13 career wins, highlighted by the 2001 PGA Championship. It’s no coincidence that during the ’01 season, when he won three times, Toms led the PGA TOUR in total putting.

    Of course, it all starts with the grip. Toms doesn’t do anything fancy or unusual when grasping the putter’s handle. Basically, he aligns both hands with the grip’s flat front surface, which automatically places them in a neutral pose. He does play the ball slightly forward in his stance, which creates a flatter left hand and wrist than you see with most pros.

    From his setup position, Toms makes an effortless pendulum stroke that surely ranks with the purest in golf history. He’s no slouch when it comes to ball-striking, either.

    David Toms’ grip with the woods and irons is a fine example of a neutral hold: The “V’s” on both hands (check the spot where thumbs meet index fingers) line up nicely with the club’s shaft. It’s a grip built for consistency, accuracy and shotmaking. So is his swing. No wonder Toms has excelled in those areas.

    While never a log hitter, Toms has gotten straighter with age. In 2014, at 47 years old, he led the tour in fairways hit at 75.5%.


Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip