Grip style: Vardon (overlapping)Vardon grip Hand position: strongstrong grip Putting grip style / hand position: Reverse overlap
    reverse overlap grip

    Dave Stockton Grip
    Dave Stockton’s grip with the putter may not have made him famous, but it’s had a remarkable trickle-down effect on today’s golfers.

    Stockton won a pair of PGA Championships (1970 and ’76) and enjoyed a stellar Champions Tour career on the strength of his dead-eye putting. Once his playing days began winding down, Stockton found great success as a teacher – specifically, as a putting guru to the pros.

    Stockton’s unique method has worked for major champions like Rory McIlroy and Phil Mickelson. While Stockton doesn’t espouse a specific way to grip the club, the key is keeping the back of the left (lead) hand square to the target line throughout the stroke.

    Gripping the putter as Stockton does certainly makes that easier. Because his left hand is in a neutral position, the back of the hand is pointed directly down the target line. Stockton merely maintains this position from start to finish, ensuring that the blade remains square.

    He’s been pretty good at reaching the greens, too. Dave Stockton’s grip, full swing version, is a bit on the strong side – left hand rotated to his right, with the right hand slipped underneath the club so that the “V” (base of thumb and index finger) aligns with the right arm.

    The compact, easy-flowing move that emanated from this grip hit greens like a machine. In his prime, Stockton routinely hit 70% or higher on the Tour’s greens-in-regulation stat.


Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip