Titleist Velocity: Addictive Distance and Feel Off the Tee




Titleist Velocity 1
Photo Packaging Product Credit: © TITLEIST Golf

Ball tested: Titleist Velocity

Category*: Premium

Specs: Construction – Two-piece; Cover – Surlyn blend; Core – Material etc; Dimples / Pattern – 332 in icosahedral design

Compression: High

Price as tested (new): $35 per dozen, but widely available around $27 per dozen

Ball notes: When Titleist introduces an all-new golf ball, it’s bound to get hyped to the heavens. So it was when the company unveiled its Velocity model in 2012. Reviews were excellent, sales brisk, and Velocity earned what appears to be a long-term spot in Titleist’s lineup.

For what it’s worth, Velocity ranks below the NXT Tour and above the DT SoLo models on the Titleist price/performance food chain. As the newest of the bunch, however, it’s got a number of features unique to the brand.

First off, there’s an LSX core which Titleist labels the company’s fastest. Indeed, Velocity is built for speed. As one story goes, the ball had to be redesigned five times in order to meet the USGA’s Overall Distance Standard – the first four versions were too long. Velocity also features a cover made from what Titleist calls an “NAZ2” formulation which translates to even greater speed with reduced spin.

Add it all up and you’ve got yet another Golf Digest Hot List gold medalist for the No. 1 ball brand in golf. The beat goes on.

Sound and feel: Velocity feels hot off the driver, solid off the irons and reasonably soft on chips and putts. Most golfers will love taking a rip at this ball with the big stick. Solid strikes are positively addicting.

Off the tee: If you think Velocity feels great, wait till you watch it in the air – and calculate your yardage. For us, it’s unquestionably the longest Titleist, and probably the straightest too. Many reviewers have compared Velocity’s distance and accuracy to the highly regarded Bridgestone e6; we don’t disagree. Velocity showed nice down-range carry and minimal sidespin.

Titleist Velocity 3
Photo Packaging Product Credit: © TITLEIST Golf


From the fairway / rough: The ball performed well here, too, but we started to notice differences between Velocity and its higher-end siblings. Perhaps slightly longer than the others, it launched high and stopped quickly without backing up on short-iron shots. From farther out, backspin was more in line with the DT SoLo than the ProV1 and NXT Tour models.

Around the green: Here, too, we had to adjust for a bit of roll-out. Velocity will suit most players just fine as long as the greens are average in firmness and speed. Hard, quick surfaces could be a different matter. Bite from bunkers was adequate and putts rolled well, though some testers have noted a tendency for the Velocity to jump hot off the blade.

Bottom line: Its lack of greenside finesse can be forgiven – Velocity is designed to generate long, straight shots, and no one can deny that it meets those goals. Golfers who struggle to get their current ball in the fairway, or to hit it sufficiently far, should absolutely consider Velocity. The gains you see off the tee could easily negate any sacrifice in the short game.

*Category key

Value/Recreational/Distance – Designed for mid- to high-handicap golfers with swing speeds below 90 mph; typically feature two-piece construction and firm covers; promote greater distance over high spin rates. Examples: Pinnacle Gold, Slazenger RAW Distance

Premium – Designed for low- to mid-handicap golfers with swing speeds of 90-99 mph; typically feature multi-layer construction and medium-soft covers; happy medium between Value/Recreational and Tour categories for distance and spin qualities. Examples: Titleist NXT Tour, Callaway HEX Diablo

Tour/Advanced/Performance – Designed for low-handicap and professional golfers with swing speeds in excess of 100 mph; typically feature multi-layer construction and soft covers; promote greater spin rates and enhanced feel over distance. Examples: Titleist ProV1, Bridgestone Tour B330

Titleist Velocity 2016 Golf Ball Review
Photo Packaging Product Credit: © TITLEIST Golf

Titleist Velocity 2016 Golf Ball Review



The Titleist Velocity retails for $35 a dozen (MSRP) and it was built with a clear purpose in mind: distance. That explains the “velocity” thing, doesn't it? So, if you're looking for improving your distance, well, the Titleist Velocity should be pretty high on your shopping list, being a long ball which will definitely suit a wide range of golfers. For decades Titleist is known for setting the standard in the golf industry, that's hardly news, and the Velocity further confirms their reputation. However, the Titleist Velocity is mainly designed and built for the average Joe, in the quest for improving the game quality not only for elite players. It's customery in the golf industry to work on golf balls from the putter backward, and Titleist did just that with the Velocity, since having a ball that feels great round after round, shot after shot on the course is hugely important. When buying cheaper golf balls, the first thing that you'll usually notice is a drop in quality when it comes to feel, but that's not the case with the Titleist Velocity, which now sets the standard in the mid-level bracket; the Velocity is an interesting blend of almost Tour-like feel, spin control and distance. I am not trying to convince you that the Titleist Velocity is comparable to the Pro V1, but in its price range, it will be very hard to find something significantly better.

The Titleist Velocity is marketed as a mid market distance golf ball, yet it's still remarkably soft around the green. Also, the Velocity doesn't disappoint in terms of feedback, and it will provide you easy-to-make and consistent shots all day long. Being true to its name, the Titleist Velocity excels when it comes to the long game scenarios, and after taking it for a test drive I was pleasantly surprised as the ball was doing much better than expected off the tee box. The speed is very good, almost on par with the Pro Vx1 and the trajectory is nice and piercing. Being a distance ball, don't expect miracles in the short game, however, the Titleist Velocity does a decent job even in this department, providing lots of feedback with the wedges and, most importantly, it never feels like a rock on the putter. Bottom line, if you're that kind of golfer looking for more roll and more distance, the Titleist Velocity is a great golf ball, and it will not disappoint you in terms of performance, consistency and durability.


*Category key

Value/Recreational/Distance – Designed for mid- to high-handicap golfers with swing speeds below 90 mph; typically feature two-piece construction and firm covers; promote greater distance over high spin rates. Examples: Pinnacle Gold, Slazenger RAW Distance

Premium – Designed for low- to mid-handicap golfers with swing speeds of 90-99 mph; typically feature multi-layer construction and medium-soft covers; happy medium between Value/Recreational and Tour categories for distance and spin qualities. Examples: Titleist NXT Tour, Callaway HEX Diablo

Tour/Advanced/Performance – Designed for low-handicap and professional golfers with swing speeds in excess of 100 mph; typically feature multi-layer construction and soft covers; promote greater spin rates and enhanced feel over distance. Examples: Titleist ProV1, Bridgestone Tour B330