Grip style: Interlockinginterlock grip Hand position: strongstrong grip Putting grip style / hand position: Reverse overlap / neutral
    reverse overlap grip

    Brooks Koepka Grip
    Strong and stronger. That’s Brooks Koepka’s grip in a nutshell.

    Brooks who, you ask? Sorry, forgot the introduction. As of January 2015, Koepka (pronounced KEP-ka) is still a relative unknown among golf fans. That doesn’t figure to last, though, as the powerful Florida State alum is considered one of golf’s most promising young players.

    Now, on to that grip. With his left hand, Koepka displays a mildly strong position – turned just far enough to his right so that the “V” between thumb and index finger aligns approximately with his right collarbone when addressing the driver.

    His right hand, however, is in a considerably stronger spot. The “V” points straight up the right arm while the back of his hand aligns with the wrist; little or no “cupping” is visible.

    Koepka relies on this grip to pound drives averaging well over 300 yards. He doesn’t hold back, either, telling Golf Digest, “The harder I swing, the straighter it goes.” Must be nice.

    While his putting isn’t quite at the level of his long game, it’s not bad, either. Brooks Koepka’s grip with his classic, blade-style putter is beautifully relaxed. His right index finger is extended, rather than curled around the handle, with virtually no tension in his arms. He stands quite close to the ball, putting his eyes directly over the line. This is a good thing. Putting instructors teach students to align the eyes either directly above or slightly inside the ball.


Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip