One handed putting for better judgement (Video)
One handed putting for better judgement (Video)

Often they asked a question and someone’s putting stroke is which hand should have the priority? Which hand should lead the stroke? In reality, they shouldn’t really have a sort of priority or leading action. They should swing together as one nice coincide unit. You often see the guys who have a bad stroke or maybe even the yips. They would have one hand that does 2 with influence. And that’s why some of the guys go to the club grip or the—sort of the club grip, the pan holder grip or even the plateau, it’s because one hand has to with dominance and would like both hands in the putting stroke to swing together.

So it’s a great way of checking if you’ve got a dominant hand in your stroke and how to try and unify them. Just put with one hand and again, it sounds complicated ‘cause I’m not a great putter 2 handed play. I’m going to be good putter one handed but again, we go out to the same on it, you do a lot of things in life with just one hand. You got plenty of control with throwing a ball, throwing a dart or writing. So you can put with just one hand.

As a drill as an exercise, you grip down nice and low and you just feel the club head rocking out. It’s nice and smooth, nice and even. What I’m looking for is to avoid any hitting or flicking. My hands don’t have massive influence here. My shoulders rock backwards and forwards. My arms stay nice and straight and back works the club nice and evenly.

Once I’ve done a few puts left handed and swept also. Put this right hand and swept over left handed. Same principle again. Rocking it backwards and forwards. Get the feeling that my hands don’t have too much influence. I’m not flicking and scooping here. And actually once I feel like I’ve got good control with one hand, I’ll just bring my other hand back in and they should feel nicely relaxed, nice and soft. They’re not arguing. They’re not fighting. The par and control is now been given back to the body and everything’s a little bit more unified.

You can actually go out and practice your puts. I don’t necessarily encourage just to do this on the course, but certainly practice your puts on the putting green, holding puts one handed, right handed, holding puts one handed left handed then holding puts together. And bizarrely, some people actually feel they are a better putter one handed.

You have to be pretty desperate to actually take that theory out in the golf course but it’s a great practice exercise for when your hands go back together, one of the hands isn’t going to dominate and fight. We’re going to keep everything nicely together as one unit and hopefully that will make you a better putter by practicing one handed.

2013-01-23

Often they asked a question and someone’s putting stroke is which hand should have the priority? Which hand should lead the stroke? In reality, they shouldn’t really have a sort of priority or leading action. They should swing together as one nice coincide unit. You often see the guys who have a bad stroke or maybe even the yips. They would have one hand that does 2 with influence. And that’s why some of the guys go to the club grip or the—sort of the club grip, the pan holder grip or even the plateau, it’s because one hand has to with dominance and would like both hands in the putting stroke to swing together.

So it’s a great way of checking if you’ve got a dominant hand in your stroke and how to try and unify them. Just put with one hand and again, it sounds complicated ‘cause I’m not a great putter 2 handed play. I’m going to be good putter one handed but again, we go out to the same on it, you do a lot of things in life with just one hand. You got plenty of control with throwing a ball, throwing a dart or writing. So you can put with just one hand.

As a drill as an exercise, you grip down nice and low and you just feel the club head rocking out. It’s nice and smooth, nice and even. What I’m looking for is to avoid any hitting or flicking. My hands don’t have massive influence here. My shoulders rock backwards and forwards. My arms stay nice and straight and back works the club nice and evenly.

Once I’ve done a few puts left handed and swept also. Put this right hand and swept over left handed. Same principle again. Rocking it backwards and forwards. Get the feeling that my hands don’t have too much influence. I’m not flicking and scooping here. And actually once I feel like I’ve got good control with one hand, I’ll just bring my other hand back in and they should feel nicely relaxed, nice and soft. They’re not arguing. They’re not fighting. The par and control is now been given back to the body and everything’s a little bit more unified.

You can actually go out and practice your puts. I don’t necessarily encourage just to do this on the course, but certainly practice your puts on the putting green, holding puts one handed, right handed, holding puts one handed left handed then holding puts together. And bizarrely, some people actually feel they are a better putter one handed.

You have to be pretty desperate to actually take that theory out in the golf course but it’s a great practice exercise for when your hands go back together, one of the hands isn’t going to dominate and fight. We’re going to keep everything nicely together as one unit and hopefully that will make you a better putter by practicing one handed.