Think

    Too many golf swings go awry the instant the club starts away from the ball. Common takeaway faults include picking the club up too quickly with the hands and wrists, pulling it too far inside the target line, or a disastrous combination of both. These issues typically produce a wild slice.

    You’ll often hear pro golfers and instructors refer to "keeping the clubhead outside the hands" on the takeaway. ("Hands inside the clubhead" means the same thing.) This puts the club on a square path and increases your chances of making an on-plane swing.

    To determine if your hands and clubhead are properly positioned, assume your normal golf stance with a full-length mirror to your right (left, if you’re left-handed). Watch your takeaway and note where the shaft points when your hands have reached the right pocket. If it points in front of you, good – the clubhead is outside your hands. If it’s already parallel to the target line or pointing behind you, your takeaway is too far inside.

    Continue swinging back until the shaft is parallel to the ground at hip height. If the shaft points straight toward the mirror or slightly in front of you, you’re in good shape. (As long as the toe points straight up, or slightly forward.) If the shaft and/or toe point behind you, that could spell trouble.

    A simple way to instill a "clubhead outside the hands" takeaway is to keep the butt of the club pointing at the right hip as it passes by. If the butt points left of this spot, you’ve got too much wrist action and/or an inside path.

    Be mindful of the rotation of your forearms on the takeaway. If you pull the club straight back without the arms and hands rolling naturally, the clubface will become closed. Check the toe’s position at the parallel point as described above; if it points well in front of you, it’s closed.

    Think Clubhead Outside the Hands for Solid Takeaway, Golf Tip 2
    Use Clubs or Alignment Sticks to Map Your Takeaway Path



    Why?
    Visual aids are advantageous in transferring your practice thoughts to your game on the course.

    How?
    Place one club or alignment stick about two feet behind the ball pointing directly at the target.
    Place a second club or alignment stick down inside the first, the same distance behind the ball. Move the second club or stick so it points slightly to the right of the target line.
    Use the aids to help visualize a proper takeaway path.

    Advantages?
    When on the golf course use your alignment routine to pick out the target line. Imagine
    swinging above the inside line like you did during practice. It will help you to be consistent
    and prevent you from swinging differently on the golf course than you do in practice.

    Start The Swing With a Good Connection

    Why?
    A good connection between the left arm and the chest will keep the club on its proper path
    and will help keep the clubface square.

    How?
    Set up to hit the ball. Take your right hand off of the club and grab your left forearm.
    Use your right arm to pull the left arm under and across your chest.

    Advantages?
    This drill allows you to feel the stretch of your left arm across the chest on the
    takeaway and will ensure your left arm is connected to your chest.

    Splitting Your Grip to Promote an Early Set

    Why?
    The earlier you set your club the lighter your club will feel. With a lighter club you won’t
    feel the need to over swing in order to get power.

    How?
    Set up as though you are hitting a shot. Slide your right hand down the grip 2-3"
    Swing the club back. You will feel the right arm fold sooner than normal, setting the
    club almost immediately.

    Advantages?
    Speed equals power. By setting the club early you essentially are swinging a lighter club.
    It allows you to have better control of the club. This will prevent you from over swinging and
    will add speed to your downswing.

    Start Your Swing With a Trigger

    Why?
    Just a small movement before your swing can help release tension and will promote a smooth takeaway.

    How?
    1. Push the grip towards the target slightly and then
    in the same fluid motion, swing the club back. Make sure
    you don’t press so far forward the clubface opens!
    2. Waggle. Back and forth, up and down, up and back or whatever pattern helps
    you trigger your takeaway.
    3. Slightly kick your right knee towards the left right before you start your takeaway.

    Advantages?
    A trigger can be a part of your routine which helps you gain confidence and
    helps you to build a smooth and consistent takeaway. Also, a tension-free smooth takeaway allows the club to be set sooner in the backswing.

    Make your golf swing better by trying these golf takeaway tips and drills!

    Think Clubhead Outside the Hands for Solid Takeaway, Golf Tip 3
    Common Issues in the Golf Swing and How to Correct Them With a Proper Golf Takeaway



    Problem-Left leg collapse on the backswing.
    Because the left leg collapses, the amount of rotation in your swing is reduced and you find yourself leaning over your left side on the backswing. The takeaway will be very steep or upright and may cause you to hit behind the ball and take deep divots.

    Solution-
    Many times this problem is caused by the ball position being too far back
    in the stance. Check your ball position to see if the ball is too far back in your stance. If it’s in the center (facing your nose) or to the right of center the ball position could be too far back.
    If you have a 2x4, turn it on its side and lay it parallel to your target line about 2-3" on the other side of the ball, so it points slightly right of your target line. If you don’t have a board then lay your headcover down instead and keep the club head hovering about the headcover.
    Set up to the golf ball as normal then lift your upper body and club slightly so that the club head is just touching the top side of the 2x4. Swing back along the top of the 2x4 and then swing down, hitting the golf ball as normal.
    This drill will assist you in having a proper takeaway by creating more rotation in the swing so that the left knee doesn’t collapse.

    Problem-Early Turn
    Many times an early turn is caused by being too close to the ball at address.
    Because you are too close, your body turns out of the way in order to make room
    for your arms to swing back.
    This causes the club too come too far inside on the takeaway forcing you to lift the club to the top of your backswing. For amateur golfers this results in what is commonly known
    as an "over the top" downswing.

    Solution-when taking your address, allow your arms to hang down from the shoulders and then grip the club. When your arms are hanging, the fingertips should be level with the top of your knees. This will give you the room to need for your arms to swing back, without having to turn early in order to make space. Make sure the arms swing under your shoulder on the takeaway.

    Problem-Hitting Fat Shots

    Hitting the ground behind the ball is a common problem that can be caused by too much movement in the swing, deceleration, or even a poor grip.

    Solution-In regards to the set-up here are a few things to check in your set-up if you are taking divots behind the ball:

    First, check your grip. The hands need to be in a position that will allow the club to square up when it’s returned to impact. Using the part of the wrist below your left thumb, make sure it’s at least slightly right of center once you take your grip.

    If that part of your wrist if left of center, then you have a weak grip. It can cause too much body movement because the club feels heavier and it’s difficult to close the club face if you don’t compensate somehow.

    If the grip is excessively to the right of center it can cause the backswing to be taken away steeply making the down swing steep as well.

    Next, check the tempo of your swing. If you are a “low and slow" person, then being too slow will make you swing down hard from the top of the backswing to get more power.

    The golf swing is dynamic and you need momentum in order to have a fluid swing.

    Take three continuous practice swings without stopping. The tempo used in your third swing should be the tempo used to hit your shots.

    On the other hand, if you take the club back too quickly then you have a good chance of slowing down, or decelerating, on the downswing. To ensure you have a smooth takeaway set up to the ball normally then turn your body slightly ahead of the ball holding the club off of the ground about a foot and a half in front of the ball. Take the club back in the air, over the ball and then swing down and hit the ball as you normally would. This drill should prevent you from yanking the club back too quickly.

    Improve your swing now with the proper golf takeaway!

    Think Clubhead Outside the Hands for Solid Takeaway, Golf Tip 4
    The Proper Golf Takeaway



    The Function of a Proper Takeaway in the Golf Swing
    The function of a proper takeaway in the golf swing is to put you in a position on the backswing
    that will allow you to hit they type of shot you want to hit on the downswing.

    Not everyone can use the same takeaway to hit identical shots. The reason is that each one of us
    is built differently. Every player has strengths and weaknesses before they even hit a shot.
    Some players have injuries and disabilities while others are handicapped by their
    age and body condition.
    For example, a tall thin guy will not have the same takeaway as a short guy. Someone who has had a hip replacement will need to make compensations in order to have their own proper takeaway. A golfer with a lack of flexibility or someone with impeded space (i.e. someone who has a belly) should have a different takeaway from other golfers. With your set up you can build your own proper takeaway for your unique set of circumstances.

    What Should a Proper Takeaway Look and Feel Like
    From a teacher’s point of view, a proper takeaway looks like the body is in balance, there
    is room for the arms to move and the takeaway it is fluid. It looks as though the golfer, through the takeaway, is giving herself/himself every chance of hitting the ball well.

    For a player the takeaway should feel smooth and unrestricted. It should feel like the club is swinging
    back to a good backswing position. The takeaway should also be pain-free, even if you don’t have any
    current injuries. One needs only to look at Jack Nicklaus, Greg Norman and Tiger Woods to note
    how repetitive golf swings can wear down joints, tendons and cartilage.

    Tips
    In order to accomplish these things, use these three simple thoughts while trying to build your
    own proper takeaway.

    1. If you are around average height and flexibility, try setting up with your alignment and clubface
    square to the target. Take the club away so that your left bicep runs across your chest. Make sure that your upper left arm stays in contact with your chest during your takeaway. This
    should get you on a proper path for your swing.
    2. If you are tall and have long arms, set up with your left foot slightly turned out. As you take the
    club back make sure it, the center of your chest and your arms all move away from the ball together.
    3. If you not flexible or you have impeded space, drop your right foot back a couple of inches
    so if you drew a line across your toes it would be pointing right of the target. On the takeaway
    simultaneously set the club and push it back away from you. Your left triceps should be on top of your chest as you start to swing the arms back. Use your foot line as a guide for your
    path.

    It seems obvious, but if you feel pain when you take the club away you need to re-evaluate your swing.

    Improve your swing by finding the proper golf takeaway for you!

    Think Clubhead Outside the Hands for Solid Takeaway, Golf Tip 5
    Golf Backswing Takeaway



    The takeaway is the initial movement in the golf swing where the club moves away from the golf ball. The takeaway covers only a small part of the length in the overall swing, but could set your swing on a course to success or disaster. Specifically, the takeaway will shape your backswing
    and then the backswing will shape the downswing.

    Some of the things that may affect your takeaway include:

    The speed which you take the club away
    A fast takeaway will typically result in swing that is disjointed and not in rhythm.
    A low and slow takeaway might be okay for someone with a one-piece takeaway but for average golfers it can also cause a disjointed swing. The takeaway should only be slightly slower than the downswing.
    Your overall balance at address
    If you have too much weight on your toes it can cause you to take the club back too far
    outside of the ball.
    If you have too much weight on your heels, the club will swing inside too far on the takeaway.
    Your distance from the golf ball
    If you stand too close to the ball at address, the takeaway will be too far to the outside.
    If you are too far away the club will swing back inside.
    Tension
    Too much tension in the can result in a stiff takeaway that lacks
    flow. Tension can cause the timing and sequence of your swing to be off.
    The body parts used to take the club back
    For most people using the upper arms to swing the club back in the initial takeaway
    will allow the club go back on the proper path and also allows the club to swing
    open slightly after the initial takeaway.
    Ball position
    If the ball is positioned towards the back of your stance, the swing will
    be too upright and cause fat shots.
    If the ball is too far forward it can promote a shallow swing and thin shots.

    Here are some ways to improve your golf takeaway to ensure that your golf swing produces positive results.

    Your Overall Balance at Address
    The amount of bend from your hips and knees has a big influence on your overall balance
    at address. Often golfers are confused as to how much bend they should have.
    To find out how much bend in the hips and knees you should have at address stand straight
    up. Bend forward first from your hips (not the waist) and let your arms hang out.
    Slowly bend your knees and keeping the hips bent, lower yourself until your finger
    tips touch the tops of your knees.
    If you have short arms (or a thick chest) you will feel the need to lower yourself more
    than someone with long arms (or a thin chest.) This drill will allow for individual differences
    so that you can find the perfect set up and balance for yourself.
    This drill will also allow you to find your perfect distance from the ball. Wherever your
    Hands hang after you have done this drill is where you should place the club in your hands.
    Tension
    An easy way to promote even grip and arm tension is to set up to the ball normally then
    lift the club so it sits just above the ground. Keep the club above the ground and swing back.
    This drill will eliminate a jerky takeaway and ensure better sequencing. Jack Nicklaus said that
    he incorporated this into his everyday golf game.

    The Body Parts Used to take the club away

    Keep your chest still and swing your left arm across your chest until you feel the club is about a foot and a half from the ball. Your left arm will hit your chest and at that point you will begin setting the club.
    If you use a one-piece takeaway, put the grip end of your club over your bellybutton and grip the club on the shaft so your arms are almost straight. Get into your golf posture and while keeping the club over your bellybutton, swing the club, your chest and arms about 18-20" away from the ball.

    Ball Position
    Let the bottom of your downswing determine where you place the ball in your stance. Rarely
    are all of your shots on flat lies, so take several practice swings next to the ball (without slowing
    down your group) and see where the club is bottoming out. Put the ball there.

    Keep working on your golf backswing takeaway by using these golf takeaway tips!

    Think Clubhead Outside the Hands for Solid Takeaway, Golf Tip 6
    Golf Takeaway Path



    Use these tips to help you decide which path is best for you:
    Straight Back Takeaway
    The path you take the club back on can influence the flight of the ball. Most amateur golfers hit the ball from left to right and would give anything to hit the ball straight or right to left. These golfers feel that they get better contact and improved shot control from straight or right to left shots.
    The takeaway path is a quick way to alter your ball flight. Imagine trying to hit the ball starting directly at the target with no curve. Wouldn’t it be great to hit a flawless straight shot all of the time!
    Ideally you would line up directly at the target with a square clubface and
    then would take the club away from the ball about 18 inches down the target line before it started
    to swing inside along your shoulder line. On the downswing the club would then return
    to the same line as your takeaway, the face would be square and you would hit a perfectly straight shot.

    Outside Takeaway
    By the same token, in order to hit a draw or fade on purpose, you would
    need to alter the path of the club on the takeaway. The easiest way to hit a draw or hook while setting up exactly the way you did for your straight shot, would be to take away the club a little outside. The club needs to swing down slightly from the inside and it’s much more simple
    to exaggerate an outside to inside path than taking the club back inside and trying to swing
    it down even more from the inside.

    Inside Takeaway
    Sticking with the theory above of how to hit a draw or hook, in order to hit a fade or slice
    you would need to alter your takeaway so that the club swings back more to the inside. This would make it easier to swing down from the outside. If the club face is still square at impact
    the ball should curve from left to right.
    Remember, if you consistently hit the ball right to left, it usually means your club comes down
    more from the inside than your takeaway path.

    Swing Tips; Things in your setup that can effect takeaway path

    If the ball is too far forward in your stance, if you have a weak right hand grip, or
    even if you were to cock your head to the left it can cause you to lean to the left as you take the club away. The result of leaning left will cause an upright and outside takeaway.

    Your shoulder alignment can have a direct effect on your takeaway
    path. Shoulders pointing to the right of the target will cause the club
    to swing inside.

    An incorrect concept can cause the ball to go where you don’t want it to. For instance, if a player wants to correct a slice, it’s difficult to get him/her to swing out to the right in order to hit a draw. The concept is, I am hitting it right so I want to line up left and swing left. Based on the information above, that concept will cause the player to have an even bigger slice.

    Learn how to create different ball flights with the appropriate golf takeaway path!

    Golf Takeaway Tips and Drills

    Start Your Swing With a Trigger

    Why?
    To release tension and promote a smooth takeaway.

    How?
    1. Waggle. Back and forth, up and down, up and back or whatever pattern helps
    you trigger your takeaway.
    2. Slightly kick your right knee towards the left right before you start your takeaway.
    3. Push the grip towards the target slightly and then
    in the same fluid motion, take the club back. Make sure
    you don’t press so far forward the clubface opens!

    Advantages?
    A trigger can be a part of your routine which helps you gain confidence and
    helps you to build a smooth and consistent takeaway. Also, a tension-free smooth takeaway allows the club to be set sooner in the backswing.

    Use Clubs or Alignment Sticks to Map Your Takeaway Path

    Why?
    Visual aids are advantageous in transferring your practice to your game on the course.

    How?
    Place one club or alignment stick about two feet behind the ball pointing directly at the target.
    Place a second club or alignment stick down inside the first, the same distance behind the ball. Move the second club or stick so it points slightly to the right of the target line.
    Use the aids to help visualize a proper takeaway path.

    Advantages?
    When on the golf course use your alignment routine to pick out the target line. Imagine
    swinging over the inside line like you did during practice. It will help you to be consistent
    and prevent you from swinging differently on the golf course than you do in practice.

    Start The Swing With a Good Connection

    Why?
    A good connection between the left arm and the chest will keep the club on its proper path
    and will help keep the clubface square.

    How?
    Set up to hit the ball. Take your right hand off of the club and grab your left forearm.
    Use your right arm to pull the left arm across your chest.

    Advantages?
    This drill allows you to feel the stretch of your left arm across the chest on the
    takeaway and will ensure your left arm is connected to your chest.

    Splitting Your Grip to Promote an Early Set

    Why?
    The earlier you set your club the lighter your club will feel. With a lighter club you won’t
    feel the need to over swing in order to get power.

    How?
    Set up as though you are hitting a shot. Slide your right hand down the grip 2-3"
    Swing the club back. You will feel the right arm fold sooner than normal, setting the
    club almost immediately.

    Advantages?
    Speed equals power. By setting the club early you essentially are swinging a lighter club.
    It allows you to have better control of the club. This will prevent you from over swinging and
    will add speed to your downswing.

    Make your golf swing better by trying these golf takeaway tips and drills!