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Should The Putter Be Moving Back And Through On A Straight Line During My Putting StrokeOn putts of less than four feet, it is possible to keep the putter face straight back - straight through with almost no manipulation of the putter head. As the length of your putt increases, the shaft angle of your putter, coupled with your address position, will cause the putter to work on a slight arc naturally.




On putts of less than four feet, it is possible to keep the putter face straight back - straight through with almost no manipulation of the putter head. As the length of your putt increases, the shaft angle of your putter, coupled with your address position, will cause the putter to work on a slight arc naturally.

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When you’re on the green facing a longer putt, most golfers will swing the putter further back and further through as a general rule. The further the putter moves in the back stroke, the more the putter will work on an arc. Trying to keep the putter working straight back – straight through will see the face looking closed at impact unless you manipulate the head during your stroke.

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If the length of the putt you face is short (under five feet) then you don’t need to move the putter head back more than four to five inches in the back stroke. A stroke of this length will see the putter head swing straight back – straight through without any manipulation of the putter head during your stroke.

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Once the length of your putt gets beyond five feet, the putter head will start to move over six inches in the back stroke. It is at this stage that the natural motion of the putter head will be on a slight arc. Even if you change your whole set up position and putter to fit the new set up, you would still produce a very slight arc in your stroke on longer putts.