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Correct Golf Answer When grass is caught between the club face and ball

Fliers are extremely frustrating because of their uncontrollable nature!




A Flier occurs when a small amount of grass gets caught in-between the club face and ball at impact. Because the club face doesnt make direct contact with the ball, the grooves cannot interact correctly which decreases back spin. However, because the amount of grass caught between the club and ball is relatively low, distance is not affected. This combination of low back spin and big distance causes shots which fly a long way through the green.

Because the back spin is reduced, even if the distance is judged correctly by a player, and the ball lands on the green, it will usually bound onward.

Fliers only usually occur in light rough because the conditions needed to create the Flier exist there. A Flier cannot occur from a bare lie because there is no grass to get caught between the club face and ball. It is also unlikely a Flier will occur in the heavy rough as their will be too much grass caught between the club and ball. If this occurs there will be no back spin but also no distance as club head speed is killed by snagging on the long grass. It is a similar story from bunkers as any sand caught between the club face and ball will greatly reduce any distance. Although Fliers occurs normally on iron shots into the green it can also affect short pitches and chips. This is something players need to be aware of when playing shots around the putting surface from fluffy grass.

A flier occurs when some grass becomes trapped between the club and ball at impact reducing back spin whilst maintaining distance.

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A Flier is not to be mistaken with a sky shot which shoots straight up in the air. Unlike the Flier, the sky shot comes from the top of the club and therefore has no power. It is normally only hit from the tee when the ball is pegged up.

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People sometimes refer to a shot that sails a long way over the green as a flier but unless it comes from a flying lie, golfers are better saying the ball sailed the green. That way there would be a lot less confusion for everyone!

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As mentioned above there are certain situations from which you cannot get a flying lie. The tee box is one such area because there is no chance of any light rough becoming trapped in-between the club face and ball.