Grip style: Vardon (overlapping)Steve Stricker Vardon grip Hand position: NeutralSteve Stricker Neutral grip Putting grip style / hand position: Reverse overlap / neutralSteve Stricker reverse overlap grip

    Steve Stricker Grip
    He has mocked his own tame-as-toast image in a widely seen rental car commercial. But as Steve Stricker’s grip shows, the veteran pro isn’t afraid to swerve outside the lines – especially with the putter in his hands.

    While hardly a radical departure from the norm, Stricker’s much-studied putting grip does vary from the textbook. First, he uses an overlapping hold, rather than the more common reverse overlap. But his strongly “uncocked” or “unhinged” left wrist is the main difference between Stricker and most players. Think of it like this: With your left arm held straight out, point your forefinger toward the ground. That’s uncocked. Point up and it’s cocked.

    By dramatically uncocking his left wrist, Stricker actually pulls the putter’s heel off the ground. He also forces the club into his palms and forms a firmly locked union between hand and forearm. The result is a rock-steady stroke with virtually no hand or wrist action.

    Like many players, Steve Stricker’s grip with the full swing – and indeed, his entire swing – is similar to his putting stroke. It’s a more palms-oriented grip than the typical pro’s, and guess what? It serves to limit wrist movement during Stricker’s backswing. (Apparently, Steve is very anti-wrists.)

    The downside to gripping the club this way? Loss of power. When the wrists are hindered, less energy is stored and unleashed into the ball. The upside? Consistent accuracy. Stricker’s grip, takeaway, backswing and downswing are beautifully synchronized, while his big-muscle control prevents wildly off-target shots.


Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip