Grip style: Interlockinginterlock grip Hand position: strongstrong grip Putting grip style / hand position: Reverse overlap / neutral
    reverse overlap grip

    Scott Stallings Grip
    We’ll go ahead and label Scott Stallings’ grip a strong one. But only barely.

    The thickly built pro from Worcester, Mass., remains somewhat anonymous despite winning three PGA TOUR events since 2011. So maybe you didn’t know he’s one of the game’s longest hitters, averaging about 300 yards per drive, or that he moonlighted as a blogger for BNET in 2011.

    Here’s the 411 on Stallings’ grip: While he shows a pronounced cup between the back of his left hand and wrist – usually a sign of a very strong grip – Stallings actually assumes a nearly neutral position. The “V’s” on both hands, formed at the base of thumbs and index fingers, point just right of a straight-up hold.

    So technically, yes, Stallings’ grip is strong. In fact, it’s almost identical to the way he grasps the putter.

    When he takes to the greens, Scott Stallings’ grip is essentially neutral with the left hand. His right hand, however, is a bit underneath the handle in a stronger alignment. Many golfers find this grip aids their ability to release the blade and get the ball rolling with good pace.

    Stallings’ putting stats tend toward middling, but he can be streaky. In winning the 2014 Farmers Insurance Open, for instance, he led the field in strokes gained putting.


Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip