Grip style: Interlockinginterlock grip Hand position: strongstrong grip Putting grip style / hand position: Reverse overlap
    reverse overlap grip

    Ryo Ishikawa Grip
    When watching Ryo Ishikawa grip the golf club, you might notice that something seems odd. But you may have trouble putting your finger on it, so to speak.

    It’s not a flaw in the young Japanese star’s technique. It’s more like a quirk. See, his left index finger is extended, rather than wrapped flush to the right hand as it pokes through the pinky and ring fingers.

    It’s no big deal, really. If you share Ishikawa’s interlocking grip style, however, you might want to check your own left forefinger. If it’s too relaxed, you could lose control of the club at the top of the backswing. Clearly, Ishikawa does not.

    Speaking of control, Ishikawa likes to grip down about an inch for most full shots, joining Rickie Fowler among the handful of pros who do so. Gripping down (aka choking up) effectively shortens the club and enhances control. You may sacrifice a little distance in the process, but not necessarily. Better clubhead control often leads to better ballstriking, which generates longer shots.

    Ishikawa’s slightly strong grip – left hand cocked just a hair to his right – is an excellent model for amateur golfers: strong enough to promote a full release and generate some extra power, but not so strong as to cause big hooks.

    Ryo Ishikawa’s grip on the putter is a good one as well. His hands are placed neutrally on the handle and stationed a few inches ahead of the ball, leaning the shaft toward the target. His grip pressure is light, his stroke steady as a metronome.


Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip