Grip style: Interlockinginterlock grip Hand position: strongstrong grip Putting grip style / hand position: Reverse overlap / neutral
    reverse overlap grip

    Ryan Moore Grip
    No one who’s seen Ryan Moore grip the golf club should be surprised by his unusual swing. Much like Jim Furyk, Moore does things a little differently from start to finish.

    Sure, Moore’s hold veers well to the strong side, especially for a pro. But he’s got company there – Fred Couples, Dustin Johnson and Ryan Palmer are among the pros with super-strong grips. What makes Moore’s different is the placement of his left thumb. He extends it so far down the club’s handle, the bottom of the thumb protrudes into the space between his right thumb and forefinger.

    This method makes Moore’s grip very “palmsy,” if you will. In other words, he wraps the handle considerably more in his palms – and less in his fingers – than most golfers. It certainly unites the hands, as does Moore’s interlocking style. The four-time PGA TOUR winner’s grip also helps explain the very large angle between his arms and the shaft at address.

    Ryan Moore’s grip on the greens isn’t exactly conventional, either. In fact, it’s just like the grip Furyk employs for full shots – double overlapping, with the right hand’s little and ring fingers draped over the corresponding digits on his left hand. The object, as with most good putting grips, is to mold the hands together and minimize wrist movement.

    Odd but effective – Moore’s grip, swing and even his wardrobe fit the same pattern. Maybe that’s why he’s so consistent.


Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip