Grip style: Interlockinginterlock grip Hand position: NeutralNeutral grip Putting grip style / hand position: Reverse overlap / neutral
    reverse overlap grip

    Russell Henley Grip
    Russell Henley’s grip is designed with a primary purpose: To foster a reliable fade.

    The young pro from Georgia, already a two-time PGA TOUR winner at age 25, has tweaked his grip in recent years under the tutelage of teacher Bobby Hix. A hold that once veered to the strong side is now essentially neutral, with the pad of his left thumb directly on top of the handle and the back of his glove aimed down the target line. His right hand is similarly positioned.

    This neutral grip allows Henley to play left-to-right shots without having to delay his release, or intentionally “block” the shot, as the club passes through impact. Strong-grip golfers like Dustin Johnson, on the other hand, must manipulate the club to prevent major hooks.

    Why would Henley want to play fades rather than draws, which produce more distance? The same reason great players from Ben Hogan to Jack Nicklaus to Tiger Woods preferred the fade – it’s much easier to control. To wit: In two seasons on tour, Henley has hit better than 63% of fairways.

    The real strength of his game, though, is putting. Russell Henley’s grip helps explain why. The 6’0”, 180-pound golfer has very large hands, which he wraps lightly around a standard-size handle in reverse overlap fashion.

    Henley displays an “uncocked” or “unhinged” left wrist, which minimizes wrist action during the stroke, and keeps the back of his left hand moving down the line in his follow-through – Dave Stockton style. The method works like a charm, propelling Henley into the tour’s top 30 for “strokes gained putting” in 2013 and ’14.


Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip