Grip style: Interlockinginterlock grip Hand position: strongstrong grip Putting grip style / hand position: Reverse overlap
    reverse overlap grip

    Ross Fisher Grip
    Ross Fisher’s grip is right in line with the 21st century professional model: strong enough to generate plenty of distance, but not too strong to control.

    The Englishman, a five-time European Tour winner who plays sparingly in the United States, is a steady performer who earned a 2010 Ryder Cup bid. That season capped a four-year run in which Fisher claimed a victory each season.

    Notable for its old-school hip turn and leg action, Fisher’s swing is founded on an excellent grip. His hands fit comfortably on the handle in matching positions. The left is turned so that the “V” between thumb and forefinger points to his right shoulder; the right hand “V” runs parallel to this line.

    The tall lanky pro, who goes 6’3”, 168 pounds, hammers his drives better than 290 yards on average. Fisher’s strength, however, is his iron play. He placed fifth in Europe for greens in regulation in both 2013 and ’14.

    Once on the greens, well, let’s just say his results could be better. Ross Fisher’s grip doesn’t appear to be an issue, though. His large hands look relaxed and comfortable on the putter, joined in classic reverse overlap style with the left wrist “uncocked.”

    It’s a putting grip that works for some of the game’s greatest, including Tiger Woods and Rory McIlroy. Fisher’s modest success with the flat-stick is likely a matter of confidence more than technique. Yes, even the world’s best struggle with golf’s mental side – especially on the greens.


Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip