Grip style: Interlockinginterlock grip Hand position: NeutralNeutral grip Putting grip style / hand position: Varies between conventional and “claw”
    conventional and “claw” grip

    Richard Sterne Grip
    Richard Sterne’s grip puts him in a minority among tour pros, but it’s served him well over the years.

    The diminutive South African has carved out a solid career on the European Tour, winning six times and making the international team for the 2013 Presidents Cup. The strength of his game has varied with time, ranging from driving accuracy to iron play to putting.

    At address, Sterne exhibits similar sound fundamentals to his better-known his countrymen, including Ernie Els, Louis Oosthuizen and Charl Schwartzel. Sterne’s left hand shows little to no angle at the wrist, making it easy for him to get the club on plane early in the backswing. His right hand “V,” formed at the base of thumb and forefinger, aligns nicely with the shaft for regular shots.

    We noticed, however, that Sterne will adopt a slightly stronger grip – especially with the right hand – when he needs extra power. For example, Sterne rolled his right hand to his right for a driver shot from the fairway during the 2014 PGA Championship. The result: a spectacular shot which found the green from 262 yards out.

    Don’t be afraid to alter your grip when you need to hit a specialty shot, such as a hard slice or a hook around trees.

    Richard Sterne’s grip on the greens is a personalized version of the so-called “claw.” He wraps his left hand around the handle with the forefinger protruding downward, similar to a reverse overlap grip. He cradles the lower part of the handle with his right hand, but places the thumb higher on the grip than other claw adherents such as Chris Kirk.

    The lesson to take from Sterne’s methods: It’s OK to experiment with your grip in order to find what works for you.

Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip