Grip style: Vardon (overlapping)Vardon grip Hand position: NeutralNeutral grip Putting grip style / hand position: Reverse overlap / neutral
    reverse overlap grip

    Rafael Cabrera Bello Grip
    Maybe it’s a Spanish thing. Rafael Cabrera-Bello’s grip, like those of many of his countrymen, is neutral in demeanor.

    It wouldn’t seem so unusual if not for the proliferation of strong grips among modern-day tour pros. But given the context, it’s noteworthy that Spaniards including Cabrera-Bello, Miguel Angel Jimenez and Pablo Larrazabal hold the club in a neutral manner.

    Cabrera-Bello, a lanky long hitter with two European Tour wins to his credit, points the “Vs” on both hands along the same line as the club’s shaft. (Note: Check the base of each thumb and forefinger to find your “Vs.”) This is a classic neutral position.

    Like many neutral grip golfers, Cabrera-Bello’s strength is his iron game. He ranked among Europe’s top 15 for greens in regulation each season from 2012-14. If you struggle to hit your irons solidly and with accuracy, a move toward the neutral position could help.

    Putting-wise, Rafael Cabrera-Bello’s grip follows a familiar template: reverse overlap, neutral hands, nice and relaxed. His putter is quite short considering he’s 6’3”; this allows Cabrera-Bello’s arms to hang long and loose from the shoulders, his elbows clear of interference as he swings the putter back and through.

    With his neutral putting grip, Cabrera-Bello can simply rock his shoulders from side to side and let the blade do its work. As long as there’s no excess wrist movement or manipulation with the hands, the putter face should remain square throughout the stroke.


Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip