Grip style: Vardon (overlapping)Miguel Angel Jimenez Vardon grip Hand position: NeutralMiguel Angel Jimenez Neutral grip Putting grip style / hand position: Reverse overlap / neutralMiguel Angel Jimenez reverse overlap grip

    Miguel Angel Jimenez Grip
    Considering its owner is known as one of golf’s most intriguing characters, Miguel Angel Jimenez’s grip is pretty dull. That’s not a bad thing, though.

    Jimenez, who turned 50 in 2014, shows his old-school roots by using a neutral grip – a style that was much more popular when the Spaniard joined the pro ranks in 1982. Nowadays, as players seek ever more distance off the tee, stronger grips are all the rage.

    Jimenez has never been a power player, however. He earned the nickname “The Mechanic” by playing a methodical, mistake-free game. While his swing is rather unusual, it begins with a grip that’s perfectly positioned: hands matching each other, “V” between thumbs and forefingers pointing to his chest, light pressure on the handle.

    With such a solid grip, it’s no wonder Jimenez’s game has stood the test of time. He never won a major title, but 21 European Tour victories and a stellar Ryder Cup record speak to Jimenez’s consistent excellence.

    On the other hand, Miguel Angel Jimenez’s grip with the putter has changed in recent years. He used the conventional, reverse overlap method for most of his career, then switched to the cross-handed method recently. It must have worked – Jimenez claimed a rare double in 2014, winning the European Tour’s Open de España and the Champions Tour’s Greater Gwinnett Championship.

    Apparently, an old dog can learn new tricks. Even an old dog as successful as Jimenez.

Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip