Grip style: Interlockinginterlock grip Hand position: strongstrong grip Putting grip style / hand position: Reverse overlap / neutral
    reverse overlap grip

    Matteo Manaserro Grip
    It’s hard for most of us to imagine becoming a professional golfer at age 17. Yet Matteo Manassero’s grip on his young career – like his hold on the club – seems rock solid.

    The Italian prodigy, who turns a wizened 22 in 2015, has been a fixture on the European Tour since his 2010 pro debut. In fact, he won tournaments in each of his first four seasons. Slightly built by 21st-century standards, the 5’11”, 164-pound golfer isn’t a long hitter. But he gets by on accuracy and uncanny putting – a combo rooted in his grip styles.

    First, the full swing. Manassero differs from many young players in that his grip isn’t super-strong. Yes, his left hand is in a mildly strong setup, with the palm turned toward his right. But Manassero’s right hand assumes a classic neutral placement: “V” between thumb and index finger aligned with the club’s handle, a small cup formed at the wrist.

    Manassero’s “mixed” grip – so called because it marries strong and weak or neutral positions – puts him in good company. Two-time major champ Angel Cabrera employs a similar style.

    When it’s time to cash in all his greens in regulation, Matteo Manassero’s grip with the putter is money in the bank. His hands are extremely relaxed, united by a traditional reverse overlap arrangement, the palms facing each other and arms hanging comfortably from the shoulders. From here, Manassero makes an effortless, back and through motion that could serve as a model for the arms and shoulders method.


Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip