Grip style: Interlockinginterlock grip Hand position: strongstrong grip Putting grip style / hand position: Cross-handed (left hand low)
    Cross-handed grip

    Louis Oosthuizen Grip
    While his swing is nearly flawless, Louis Oosthuizen’s grip is a bit unconventional. But only a bit.

    The 2010 Open Championship winner and 2012 Masters runner-up, Oosthuizen is a 5’10”, 180-pound ball of power and precision. His swing is a virtual study in perfect positions, from posture to plane to hip and shoulder rotation.

    Oosthuizen’s grip is only slightly off what a golf teacher would call ideal. His hands are turned into a strong position, with a noticeable “cup” between the back of his left hand and wrist as his glove’s logo points right of target. Oosthuizen’s right hand essentially mirrors his left, with the “V” of the thumb and forefinger directed just inside the right shoulder.

    This grip method helps Oosthuizen generate prodigious distance, especially for his size. In 2014, he ranked 21st on the PGA TOUR with an average drive of 300.5 yards.

    Solid as he is from tee to green, the South African has had his struggles with the putter. That’s why he’s gone back and forth between grip styles – conventional to cross-handed – so often in recent years. As of early 2015, Louis Oosthuizen’s grip is the latter, with the fingers of his left hand overlapping those on his right.

    “My putting strategy is simple,” Oosthuizen told Golf Digest. “If you're not making putts, don't be afraid to change your technique. That's how I avoid slumps.” Words of wisdom from a major champion.


Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip