Grip style: Vardon (overlapping)Lee Trevino Vardon grip Hand position: strongLee Trevino strong grip Putting grip style / hand position: Reverse overlap / neutralLee Trevino reverse overlap grip

    Lee Trevino Grip
    Lee Trevino’s grip was about the last thing anyone noticed about the “Merry Mex.” But since he’s one of history’s greatest ballstrikers – and champions – Trevino’s grip is worth a good look.

    In his heyday (late 1960s to mid-1980s), Trevino was considered to have a stronger grip than the average pro. In today’s game, where strong grips are in vogue, it seems much closer to neutral. Trevino’s right hand is a bit underneath the handle, with the “V” between his right thumb and forefinger aimed at his right shoulder. The left hand isn’t quite so strong, turned just a touch away from the target.

    By any description, Trevino’s grip was certainly effective. Master of the power fade and the so-called “burning wedge,” he won six major titles and wowed galleries with his shotmaking prowess. And he did it all while amusing fans and peers with a non-step flow of chatter and sharp one-liners.

    He was no slouch on the greens, either.

    With the putter, Lee Trevino’s grip is fairly conventional. However, his hands are slightly less unified than most golfers’, as his left forefinger covers only the right pinky when Trevino assumes the reverse overlap position. Other players tend to place the forefinger across at least two, and sometimes three, fingers of the right hand.

    Once you get past his looping swing, amazing play and hilarious quips, Trevino’s grip – with any club in the bag – merits serious attention.


Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip