Grip style: Interlockinginterlock grip Hand position: strongstrong grip Putting grip style / hand position: Reverse overlap / neutral
    reverse overlap grip

    Kevin Streelman Grip
    Two-time PGA TOUR winner Kevin Streelman’s grip could pass for just about any pro’s these days. That is, it’s a little on strong side.

    It’s a common theme as pro golfers – like their amateur counterparts – chase extra yards like dogs after stray cats. As a 5’10”, 175-pounder in a game full of ever-larger men, Streelman can use every inch he can find. He doesn’t, however, sacrifice much if any accuracy in the search. In 2013 and ’14, he ranked among the tour’s top 25 in fairway percentage.

    Streelman’s left hand is clearly turned to his right on the handle, with the back of his hand and forearm facing forward. The right hand is closer to a classic neutral position, though still slightly strong. This is a very comfortable, functional way to grip the club.

    Kevin Streelman’s grip with the putter isn’t out of the ordinary, either. Reverse overlap, nice and neutral with the hands, extremely light pressure. His hands do appear a little farther apart than most pros’, though, while his left wrist may be in a more “uncocked” or “unhinged” position.

    When putting, Streelman strives for feel. That’s why his grip pressure is so light. This allows the putter to swing naturally back and through, whereas a firm grip tightens the forearms and creates a jabby, restricted stroke.

    Keeping your grip pressure light is especially critical on fast greens. If you struggle to stop putts from racing past the cup when the greens get slick, take a cue from Streelman and lighten up.


Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip