Grip style: InterlockingJordan Spieth interlock grip Hand position: Slightly weak left hand, slightly strong right handJordan Spieth neutral grip Putting grip style / hand position: Cross-handed (left hand low)
Jordan Spieth Cross-handed grip

Jordan Spieth

Unlike many golf phenoms, this precocious Texan doesn’t boast textbook form. In fact, “unorthodox” would be a kind way of describing Jordan Spieth grip.

Practically all accomplished golfers, from pros to the club level, match their left and right hands on the handle. In other words, the palms face each other directly regardless of their position (neutral, weak or strong).

Not Spieth’s. His left hand is in a relatively weak position, or rotated toward the target, while his right is somewhat strong, or rotated away from the target. This causes Spieth’s left arm to bend slightly while his left wrist bows outward at the top of the backswing.

It’s neither conventional nor pretty, but it certainly works. Still, many observers believe Jordan Spieth will have to alter his grip at some point to ensure long-term success.

Jordan Spieth grip with the putter is a standard cross-handed (left hand low) configuration, a la Jim Furyk. Designed to eliminate wrist movement during the stroke, the cross-handed method clearly works for Spieth. In 2014, he ranked among the PGA Tour leaders in the “Strokes Gained Putting” category and putts within the 15’ – 25’ range.

With a Tour win under his belt at age 20 and a consistently solid follow-up season, Spieth appears poised for a long run as one of the world’s top players. Will he continue to use the odd grip that got him this far? And if he does change, will it help or hamper his game?

Time will tell.

Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip