Grip style: Vardon (overlapping)Jonas Blixt Vardon grip Hand position: strongJonas Blixt strong grip Putting grip style / hand position: Cross-handed (left hand low)Jonas Blixt Cross-handed grip

    Jonas Blixt Grip
    He’s the very definition of a modern golfer, so it’s no surprise that Jonas Blixt’s grip is the picture of 21st century technique.

    A Swede who played collegiately at Florida State and turned pro in 2008, Blixt has quietly ascended the world rankings. PGA TOUR wins in 2012 and ’13 raised his profile, and a second-place tie in the 2014 Masters brought Blixt fame among a wider audience.

    Known for his colorful, tight-fitting wardrobe, Blixt displays the wide stance and limited hip turn favored by younger stars. Likewise, his grip is similar to peers such as Jason Day and Keegan Bradley – toward the strong side.

    At address, the “V” formed by Blixt’s right thumb and forefinger points almost straight up his right arm. The left hand’s “V” aims just inside the right shoulder, with the back of his left wrist cupped considerably.

    Amateur golfers who struggle with distance may gain length by strengthening their grip. Blixt checks in at just 5’10” and 164 pounds, but manages an average drive of about 290 yards. A strong grip aids the hands’ release through impact and can help quell a slice.

    When he putts, Jonas Blixt’s grip is yet another sign of the times. He’s an adherent of the cross-handed method employed by, among youngsters, Jordan Spieth. It’s effective, too. In 2012, Blixt ranked second on tour in “strokes gained putting.

Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip