Grip style: Vardon (overlapping)Vardon grip Hand position: strongstrong grip Putting grip style / hand position: Reverse overlap / neutral
    reverse overlap grip

    John Senden Grip
    Not only does John Senden grip the golf club in a strong manner, he further strengthens his hand position to begin the takeaway.

    Long considered one of the PGA TOUR’s finest ballstrikers, Senden sets up with his left palm nearly on top of the handle – looking at his setup face-on, you can see every knuckle on the back of Senden’s left hand. If that weren’t strong enough, Senden initiates a forward press and twists the hand a touch more to his right. By the time he’s begun the backswing, his grip is verges on the super-strong category occupied by guys like Fred Couples and Ryan Palmer.

    Senden’s right hand, in fact, is less strong by comparison. You can see a slight cup at the wrist while the “V” between thumb and forefinger traces a line several inches inside his right arm.

    It’s a grip more befitting a power hitter than a fairway finder, yet Senden’s accuracy exceeds his driving distance. He’s often ranked among the tour’s top 40 in fairway percentage, even higher for greens in regulation, yet typically rates middle of the pack for yardage.

    Given his solid tee-to-green game, you’d expect the Australian to hold more than two career victories. Blame the putter. John Senden’s grip with the flat-stick doesn’t appear to be the issue, however. It’s nice and solid, neutral in position and light of pressure.

    On the plus side, Senden enjoyed perhaps his best year on the greens in 2014, finishing 14th in strokes gained putting. Every strong performance has to start somewhere.


Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip