Grip style: Vardon (Double overlap)Jim Furyk Vardon grip Hand position: NeutralJim Furyk Neutral grip Putting grip style / hand position: Cross-handed (left hand low)
    Jim Furyk Cross-handed grip

    Jim Furyk Grip
    He may be a meat-and-potatoes guy from western Pennsylvania, but Jim Furyk’s grip is anything but conventional. Then again, neither is anything else about Furyk’s game.

    Furyk takes the standard overlap (aka Vardon) grip style a step farther. Rather than placing his right little finger in the gap between the left index and middle fingers, he puts it between the middle and ring fingers. Furyk’s right ring finger goes where the pinky would normally be, creating a double overlap grip unique to professional golf.

    It’s not the kind of grip you’d expect from a guy whose dad was a teaching pro, but this is Furyk we’re talking about. In fact, the grip works well with his figure-eight swing. In effect, the double overlap limits Furyk’s hand action and prevents him from hitting wild hooks. Were he to hold the grip more in his fingers, Furyk would have extreme difficulty controlling the ball as he does.

    If you tend to his lots of curving shots, the Jim Furyk grip style could work for you. It will limit your distance, however, so it’s best for golfers who generate ample power with their big muscles.

    Furyk has always been one of the PGA TOUR’s steadiest putters, and his grip has never varied. He’s been a left-hand-low (cross-handed) guy forever. It’s telling that his putting grip, like his full swing grip, serves to quiet the hands and wrists. Furyk proves that a consistent approach to every club – driver through putter – leads to consistent results.


Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip