Grip style: Vardon (overlapping)Jason Day Vardon grip Hand position: Very strongJason Day strong grip Putting grip style / hand position: Reverse overlap / neutral
Jason Day reverse overlap grip

Jason Day Grip
Jason Day’s grip took a turn in 2014, a matter of necessity rather than choice. The young Aussie, who turned pro at age 18 in 2006, suffered injuries to his left thumb and wrist early in the 2014 season. To relieve the pain and pressure caused by the right hand pressing on the left thumb, he rotated his left hand slightly left (toward the target) into a weaker position.

As if the injuries weren’t hindrance enough, making any grip change – especially weakening one’s grip – can be a difficult adjustment. And while Day admitted to struggling with the change, he still managed to tie for 15th at the PGA Championship and post three top-seven finishes in four FedEx Cup playoff events. (He withdrew from the fourth tourney with an injured back.)

Prior to the adjustment, Day’s grip was a little on the strong side, with the back of his left hand pointing slightly upward, rather than directly at the target, at address. This is a pretty common position among modern-day pros as they try to maximize their driving distance. A strong grip can help many amateurs, too.

Known for his power but also an excellent putter, Jason Day’s grip with the flat stick is picture perfect. His palms are parallel in a neutral position, the left wrist “un-cocked” or “un-hinged” to prevent excess movement while keeping the forearm and putter face aligned. Also worth noting is Day’s grip pressure – it’s extremely light, which prevents tension and enhances touch on fast greens.

Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip