Grip style: InterlockingHunter Mahan interlock grip Hand position: strongHunter Mahan strong grip Putting grip style / hand position: Reverse overlap / neutralHunter Mahan reverse overlap grip

    Hunter Mahan Grip
    As the fundamental component in a swing that some have called the best in golf, Hunter Mahan’s grip deserves a close look. Indeed, it’s a grip many amateurs would be wise to copy.

    The Oklahoma State product uses the interlocking style, a la Tiger Woods and Rory McIlroy. If you’ve got smallish hands or tend to overuse your wrists in the swing, interlocking is a good alternative to the Vardon (overlapping) style.

    Mahan’s hand positioning is superb. Both hands are just slightly turned to his right on the handle, a mildly strong position, which helps him set the club on plane on the takeaway and generate a full release at impact (complementing his great hip rotation and maxing out his power).

    To emulate Mahan’s grip, place the left (top) hand so that you can see about 2 ½ knuckles when addressing the ball. Your right hand should directly mirror this position, with the “V” formed at the base of thumb and forefinger pointed just inside your right shoulder.

    While he tends to be a little streaky on the greens, Hunter Mahan’s grip with the putter is rock solid. You might even call it boring. His palms are parallel on the shaft, with the back of his left hand slightly cupped rather than perfectly flat.

    Also of note, Mahan’s left wrist is in an “uncocked” position, which aligns his left arm and the shaft to promote a steady, back-and-through motion. Grip the putter like Hunter and you’ll simplify your stroke.


Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip