Grip style: InterlockingHarris English interlock grip Hand position: strongHarris English strong grip Putting grip style / hand position: Reverse overlap / neutral
    Harris English reverse overlap grip

    Harris English Grip
    In any language, Harris English’s grip would be called “strong.” So would his game.

    The former prep phenom and University of Georgia product turned pro in 2011, earned his PGA TOUR card in 2012, claimed his maiden victory the next year and followed it up with a second win in 2014. Now that’s how you start a career.

    English starts his swing with one of the strongest grips you’ll see from a pro – up there with the likes of Fred Couples and Paul Azinger. At address, his left hand is rotated so far to his right that all four knuckles appear to the viewer looking face-on. Put another way, the logo on his glove points way, way right of his target. The back of English’s right hand forms a straight, flat line with his wrist and forearm, matching the left hand’s strength.

    As you’d expect from a 6’3, 185-pound golfer with a classic power hitter’s grip, English can bomb it off the tee. He averaged 299.2 yards in 2014, 26th on tour.

    One more note about English’s full-swing grip: He uses the interlocking method, usually recommended for small-handed players (like Jack Nicklaus). Just because you’ve got big mitts, don’t rule out this grip style.

    Speaking of big, Harris English’s grip on the putter holds an oversize handle – a very popular choice among today’s pros. His pre-shot routine is worth emulating. After stepping to the ball, English places his right hand lightly on the putter and aligns the blade. He then takes his left hand grip and, after perhaps two seconds, strokes the putt.

    It’s a simple, quick method that can speed up play and eliminate over-thinking.


Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip