Grip style: Interlockinginterlock grip Hand position: strongstrong grip Putting grip style / hand position: Reverse overlap / neutral
    reverse overlap grip

    George Coetzee Grip
    There’s nothing flashy about George Coetzee’s grip. Or his game, for that matter.

    Check that: Coetzee led the European Tour in putting in 2014. That’s an eye-opening feat, indeed.

    We’ll take a look at the South African’s putting grip first. It’s pretty standard issue for a tour pro: reverse overlap, with the left index finger extended across the bottom three fingers of his right hand. The left hand lies neutrally on the handle, with the right hand just a tad on the strong side.

    The only unusual aspect of Coetzee’s putting grip is the position of his left wrist. Where most pros feature a strong “uncocked” or “unhinged” posture here, Coetzee’s wrist is essentially flat (i.e., neither cocked nor uncocked). The lesson: There’s more than one correct way to hold the putter.

    On to the full swing. George Coetzee’s grip with the driver, woods and irons is basic and well-balanced. The left hand has a pronounced angle at the wrist and a “V” (between thumb and forefinger) pointed right of his sternum. Coetzee’s right hand “V” neatly parallels this position, assuring that his arms work together throughout the swing.

    Coetzee enjoyed an excellent season in 2014, notching his first European Tour victory. For better or worse, putting accounted for much of his success. Coetzee’s driving distance and accuracy, as well as his greens in regulation figures, were quite pedestrian.

    It goes to show how important putting can be, even at golf’s highest level. Check that: especially at golf’s highest level.


Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip