Grip style: InterlockingGary Woodland interlock grip Hand position: NeutralGary Woodland Neutral grip Putting grip style / hand position: Reverse overlap / neutral
    Gary Woodland reverse overlap grip

    Gary Woodland Grip
    He obviously has great hands, having briefly played basketball at Washburn University. So it makes sense that Gary Woodland’s grip would be a textbook model.

    A two-time PGA TOUR winner from Topeka, Kansas, Woodland is one of the game’s best, most powerful athletes. The 6’1”, 195-pounder’s natural strength allows him to grip the club in a perfectly neutral position – as opposed to using a strong grip – and still rank among golf’s longest hitters. He’s typically in the tour’s top 10 at more than 300 yards per drive.

    It’s hard to find fault with Woodland’s grip. His hands cradle the handle with minimal tension, the back of his left hand pointed toward the target. Trace a line from the “V” on his right hand (between thumb and index finger) and you’ll land just right of Woodland’s neck. Beautiful.

    When putting, Gary Woodland’s grip is similarly sound. The actual grip on his putter is oversized, putting more of Woodland’s palms (vs. the fingers) in touch with the handle. He assumes a nice, neutral position and eases the blade back and through without wasted motion.

    With belly and long putters all the rage – at least until 2016, when “anchoring” is outlawed – Woodland appears to go the opposite direction. His putter seems short relative to his height, which lets his arms hang freely and away from his body. Many golfers feel more comfortable with a shorter flat-stick, so give it a shot if you’re struggling on the greens.


Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip