Grip style: Interlockinginterlock grip Hand position: NeutralNeutral grip Putting grip style / hand position: Reverse overlap / neutral
    reverse overlap grip

    Fredrik Jacobson Grip
    Want to see how it was done in the old days? Watch Fredrik Jacobson grip the golf club.

    “Freddie,” as he’s known to fans and fellow players, uses a neutral grip that borders on weak, a la Ben Hogan. It’s a stark departure from the strong grip of the average modern pro.

    When Jacobson sets up to the shot, the back of his left hand is nearly flush with his forearm; there’s very little angle at the wrist. Many tour players, conversely, show a pronounced angle here as they turn the left hand toward a strong position.

    Jacobson’s right hand is in a classic neutral spot, too. Look at the “V” at the base of thumb and index finger and notice that it aligns neatly with the shaft. This means the hand is more on top of the club than underneath it, preventing a hard release through the ball that can cause big hooks.

    Indeed, Jacobson’s tee shots tend to miss right more often than left – exactly what you’d expect from a player with his grip. Likewise, Jacobson’s one of the shorter hitters out there.

    He makes up for it on the greens, though. Fredrik Jacobson’s grip with the putter is certainly unorthodox, but it’s been deadly of late. He led the PGA TOUR in strokes gained putting in early 2015, and ranked among the top 18 three times from 2011-14.

    Much like Englishman Danny Willett, Jacobson folds his right hand pinky, ring and middle fingers around those same fingers on his left hand. He further unites hands to club by extending his left forefinger down the handle.

    Golfers who battle excess wrist action might find a cure in Jacobson’s odd but effective putting grip.


Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip