Grip style: Vardon (overlapping)Vardon grip Hand position: NeutralNeutral grip Putting grip style / hand position: Reverse overlap / neutral
    reverse overlap grip

    Francesco Molinari Grip
    Straight down the middle. That describes Francesco Molinari’s grip, and most of his tee shots, too.

    The Italian pro routinely hits 70% or more of fairways to rank among the most accurate golfers on the European Tour. That’s partly why he’s finished among the tour’s top 35 in earnings for seven consecutive years (2008-14) and made a pair of Ryder Cup teams.

    Molinari, whose older brother Edoardo is also an accomplished pro, grips the club in model fashion. It’s hard to go wrong with a left hand that’s virtually square to the target and a right hand whose “V” (at the base of thumb and forefinger) aligns almost perfectly with the shaft. From here, swinging on plane with little or no wasted motion is a relative breeze. So is hitting both draws and fades.

    More than just a straight driving machine, Molinari is proficient with the irons as well. He’s hit better than 70% of greens in regulation every year since 2010.

    Standing over all those birdie putts, Francesco Molinari’s grip is simple and classic. Like most pros, he uses a reverse overlap style and places the hands in neutral. Just before pulling the putter back, he moves the hands toward the target (a motion called a “forward press”) and flattens the left wrist. He then completes a beautifully efficient, arms-and-shoulders stroke which – in conjunction with his neutral grip – helps maintain a square blade going back and through.

    Take this lesson from Francesco Molinari: To make golf as simple as possible, a neutral grip is the way to go.


Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip