Grip style: Vardon (overlapping)Erik Compton Vardon grip Hand position: strongErik Compton strong grip Putting grip style / hand position: Reverse overlap / neutralErik Compton reverse overlap grip

    Erik Compton Grip
    There’s no better feel-good story in golf than Erik Compton. A two-time heart transplant recipient, he defied the odds – to say the least – in making it to the PGA TOUR. Tying for second at the 2014 U.S. Open was an amazing feat, indeed.

    Erik Compton’s grip isn’t nearly as interesting as his life story, but it’s a good one to study. It’s a strong model, which helps Compton generate more power than you’d expect from a 5’8”, 150-pound golfer. His left and right hands are both turned noticeably on the handle, with the right hand’s “V” (formed by thumb and forefinger) pointing at his right shoulder. By comparison, a neutral grip “V” points much closer to the sternum.

    How does Compton prevent a nasty hook with such a strong grip? Like many players with similar styles, his hands lag a bit behind the hips coming into impact. This keeps the hands from flipping too quickly, producing a “block” action that actually straightens his shots.

    When putting, Erik Compton’s grip is standard-issue: nice and neutral, with the back of his left hand pointed down the target line. He maintains this wrist position all the way through the stroke, the method espoused by putting guru Dave Stockton. Others Stockton acolytes include Rory McIlroy.

    Compton also uses an oversized putting grip, popular among today’s pros as a means of minimizing the hands’ influence on the stroke.

Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip